Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I currently have a WCF web API that I have split into two versions. The first version runs at api.mysite.com. The second is currently not published to production.

I would like a way to publish the second API such that requests to the first version are non-interrupted. My ideas would be to add a x-api-version header and internally route the request to the designated API. If there is no header, then default to version 1. I considered adding /v1 or /v2 to the beginning of the path to delimit the version such that a request to v1 or v2 might look like:

http://api.mysite.com/v1/authentication/login
http://api.mysite.com/v2/auth/login

The only caveat is that requests without the version must work and default to version 1 (or whatever version I specify).

Although this sounds good (to me at least), I'm not sure on what the recommended way of implementing this would be. I know that I could always do some sort of reverse proxy but, I'm hoping that my solutions can be a programatic one. The less configuration that is required on the part of the server, the better. If anyone has any ideas or links to blogs/tutorials, that would be fantastic!

Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
    
This is how google does v=1.0 http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/services/search/web?v=1.0&rsz=8&q=stackoverflow‌​ –  L.B Jan 16 '12 at 20:19
    
I see the 'version header' and 'version URI' as similar approaches, and I would support them both. Having it in the URI is VERY helpful for developers - it makes it easy to experiment with services through a browser. I would also support a 'versionless URI' which redirects to the current 'active' version (this would usually be the latest version, but you might have scenarios where you stage new versions but dont activate them publicly). It really depends on your criteria. –  Adam Jan 17 '12 at 0:17
    
After looking at implementation details, I believe that I am going to have to lean more toward the URI approach strictly due to technical ease. However, I believe that I can take this approach while still meeting my original requirement of not breaking the clients of the current API. –  John Jan 17 '12 at 13:40
add comment

3 Answers 3

Microsoft has a decent article on versioning with WCF here

share|improve this answer
    
This is a great article for versioning. However, I believe that it fails to meet the goals that I have for my API. Like I mentioned in a comment to Erno's answer, I want the API to be intuitive. I want to stay away from versioning specific services and/or contracts in any way that is visible to the client. I want the client to only see a versioning of the API as a whole –  John Jan 17 '12 at 14:07
add comment
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Ok, I enjoyed the answers that I have received so far (thank you both) but, it didn't quite solve my problem given the constraints and goals that I have with my API. So, I wanted to detail the solution that I have found and plan to use.

To start, I am versioning my API via the URI. This is to mean that various versions of the API will look like:

http://api.mysite.com/authentication/login
http://api.mysite.com/v1/authentication/login
http://api.mysite.com/v2/auth/login
http://api.mysite.com/v3/auth/letmeinplease
... you get the point ...

The important thing to note here is that if I do not include a version number, then I default to version 1. This will be my current setup however, it could just as easily default to the latest version, latest stable, etc.

Here we go. I created a folder in which the application will live (wwroot/api). Inside that folder I created folders for all of the versions: v1, v2, etc. Now, in IIS (7.5 for me) I created a new project which had an application root of wwroot/api/v1. Then I added each version folder (including v1) as a sub-application. This allows me to version the API via the URI (as seen above) however, there is a caveat.

Web.config inheritance can really be a pain. So, I made sure to disable it for all of my api versions. A reference on how to do this can be found here. With that exception, everything works like a charm! :-)

share|improve this answer
add comment

To keep the current API working just keep the URI available and (when needed) map it to the next version (while keeping the old url available)

The only thing I would change is the place of the version:

http://api.mysite.com/authentication/v1/login
http://api.mysite.com/authentication/v2/login

If you feel the need to change the name from one version to the next that is ok.

http://api.mysite.com/authentication/v1/login
http://api.mysite.com/auth/v2/login

You just have to handle/map the old API to the new one.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes that would technically work but, I don't think it has the end goal that I want of having a API that seems predictable, well thought-through, and intuitive. The v1 and v2 seem arbitrary as to their location in the URL (and would depend on the particular service/endpoint). –  John Jan 17 '12 at 12:36
    
@John - I put the v1 and v2 after the name of the contract/interface name to indicate a version of the contract. Moving it to the end would suggest a new version of the method/operation. –  Erno de Weerd Jan 17 '12 at 12:46
    
Yes, but who is to say that I won't introduce new contracts. Perhaps I had a contract Users which contained various user-function. But, it grew too unwieldy, so I split it off into various contracts. Let's say UserSettings was one. It would be introduced in the next version of the API (let's assume 2) so the call to /UserSettings/v2 would assume that there exists a /UserSettings/v1. I want everything to be as consistent as possible and versioning the contracts seems to indicate that they will always be the same. If I version the API it only assumes that there will always be and API :-) –  John Jan 17 '12 at 13:38
    
I choose to version contracts. A contract with a different name is a different contract, not a new version. –  Erno de Weerd Jan 17 '12 at 14:09
    
So how would you tell your users what the newest version is? Would you give them a list of all your contracts and all of their versions? –  John Jan 17 '12 at 14:12
show 2 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.