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Is there a way to declare a variable like this before actually initializing it?

    CGFloat components[8] = {
        0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0,
        0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.15
    };

I'd like it declared something like this (except this doesn't work):

    CGFloat components[8];
    components[8] = {
        0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0,
        0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.15
    };
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2  
No, there isn't. –  Paul Tomblin Jan 16 '12 at 21:18
1  
@PaulTomblin: Not as the OP has suggested, but it is possible to assign to arrays in a few different ways. –  dreamlax Jan 16 '12 at 21:27
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3 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted

You cannot assign to arrays so basically you cannot do what you propose but in C99 you can do this:

CGFloat *components;
components = (CGFloat [8]) {
    0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0,
    0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.15
};

the ( ){ } operator is called the compound literal operator. It is a C99 feature.

Note that in this example components is declared as a pointer and not as an array.

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Awesome, thanks! This was what I needed! –  RyJ Jan 16 '12 at 21:56
    
This avoids the error alright but It does not populate the array. I am trying to use this idea in Quartz to set default values of two CGFloat arrays to hold color values and it,s not working.; I initialize the pointer static CGFloat * color, then I try this approach and do color = (CGFloat[4]){1.0, 0.0, 0.0, 1.0}; and then call CGContextSetFill(context, color) it does not draw. If I simply do static color[4]; then color[0] = 1.0; color[3] = 1.0 and repeat the fill call , it works as expected. What am I doing wrong? Thanks. –  Miek Apr 26 '13 at 15:12
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If you wrap up your array in a struct, it becomes assignable.

typedef struct
{
    CGFloat c[8];
} Components;


// declare and initialise in one go:
Components comps = {
    0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0,
    0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.15
};


// declare and then assign:
Components comps;
comps = (Components){
    0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0,
    0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.15
};


// To access elements:
comps.c[3] = 0.04;

If you use this approach, you can also return Components structs from methods, which means you can create functions to initialise and assign to the struct, for example:

Components comps = SomeFunction(inputData);

DoSomethingWithComponents(comps);

comps = GetSomeOtherComps(moreInput);

// etc.
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That notation for arrays and structs is valid only in initializations, so no.

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