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Is it reasonable to make a rule against explicitly calling Dispose() on an IDisposable object?

Are there any cases where a using statement cannot properly ensure an IDisposable object is cleaned up?

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As much as I like to let the Garbage Collector manage my memory for me, I have no reservations against calling Dispose() if i have any reason to do so. –  Sam I am Jan 16 '12 at 23:08
4  
@SamIam: The point of calling Dispose is to free a resource that the memory manager does not free for you. Dispose is explicitly about managing non memory resources, so don't bring the memory manager into it at all. –  Eric Lippert Jan 16 '12 at 23:15

6 Answers 6

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Is it reasonable to make a rule against explicitly calling Dispose() on an IDisposable object?

No.

Are there any cases where a using statement cannot properly ensure an IDisposable object is cleaned up?

There are certainly cases where it makes no sense to use using to dispose an object for you. For example, all cases where the desired lifetime of the object is not bound by a particular activation of a method containing a using statement.

Consider for example a disposable object which "takes over management" of another disposable object. The "outer" object may well be disposed by a using block, but how is the "inner" object, likely stored in a private field of the outer object, to be disposed without an explicit call to Dispose()?

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A good, clean answer! I suppose the question bubbled up out of my retired love for C++ and its clean syntax for expressing RAII. –  Nick Strupat Jan 17 '12 at 0:17
1  
@NickStrupat: By "clean syntax" you mean "the character } causes code to execute". This is not a "clean" syntax, this is a dangerously misleading syntax. The character which demarcates a lexical scope should not be associated with executable code; the fact that it is in C++ is one of the design flaws of C++. It continues to be a mystery to me why anyone thinks this is a good idea; if my resource cleanup code is important then I want it to be explicit in the code so that I can read, understand and debug it. If it is important, don't hide it. –  Eric Lippert Jan 17 '12 at 0:23
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@EricLippert - to play devil's advocate, the } that closes a using block in C# arguably causes code to execute too. Do you feel that it is "dangerously misleading" syntax, or is the presence of "using" at the start of the block sufficient to excuse it? –  kvb Jan 17 '12 at 12:34
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@kvb: The "using" (or the "foreach" or the "lock") clearly calls out that the block that follows it has special semantics. –  Eric Lippert Jan 17 '12 at 14:30
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@EricLippert, I think it's not unusual that Dispose is used for correctness. For example, calling Dipose() on a StreamWriter flushes its buffer. Not calling it (and relying on finalization) means the buffer is never flushed, so the contents of the file are incorrect. –  svick Jan 17 '12 at 16:57

In some cases it's simply not possible to avoid an explicit call to Dispose and still maintain proper semantics. For example consider IDisposable objects which have a field also of type IDisposable. They must us an explicit call to Dispose to dispose the field

class Container : IDisposable {
  private readonly IDisposable _field;

  public void Dipose() {

    // Don't want a using here.
    _field.Dispose();
  }
}
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1  
well, you COULD still use a using block to trigger the disposal... but it would be weird since it wouldn't match the object's entire lifetime, just its death. The using control expression doesn't have to create the object, it just has to assign a variable. –  Ben Voigt Jan 16 '12 at 23:06
    
@BenVoigt yes you could use a using. It would be a bit of overkill though ;0 –  JaredPar Jan 16 '12 at 23:06

A using statement (which really is shorthand for a try/finally with Dispose called in the finally block) is for scenarios where you acquire a resource, make use of it, then dispose of it within one same method. If you don't have such a linear usage of the resource (e.g. its usage is split across methods) you will have to call Dispose.

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One natural assumption is that you can always call Dispose on an object, and this will clean up the object's resources, regardless of what state the object is in.

This natural assumption is not always a correct assumption.

An example is with WCF client proxies..

The correct way to manage proxy lifetime is as follows:

var serviceClient = new sandbox.SandboxServiceClient();
serviceClient.HelloWorld(name);
if(serviceClient.State == CommunicationState.Faulted)
{
    serviceClient.Abort();
}
else
{
    serviceClient.Dispose();
}

Switching to the using syntax will result in unsafe code:

using (var serviceClient = new sandbox.SandboxServiceClient()) 
{
    serviceClient.HelloWorld(name);
}  // Here An exception will be thrown if the channel has faulted

You could argue (as we all do) that this is a flawed design aspect of WCF, but the reality of programming is that we sometimes have to modify our style to accommodate the frameworks we're using. Here's an example where a blanket rule against explicit Dispose cannot apply, even when the lifetime of the object is contained within one function call.

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If the cost of creating instances of a disposable type is high (e.g. a type which encapsulates a remote connection), you may want to reuse instances to amortize the cost. In that case using will not be useful and you'll have to call Dispose at some point.

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I would vote against such rule, what if you have an object you want to use multiple times across several function calls, a using statement will force the disposal of that object, the next time you want to use it, you have to re-initialize...

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