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I am calling these functions:

unsigned blah[5];
lseek(0, 100, SEEK_CUR);
read(0, blah, sizeof(blah));

and

FILE *fr;
fr = fopen(arg[1], "r");
unsigned blah[5];
fseek(fr, 100, SEEK_CUR);
fread(blah, 1, sizeof(blah), fr);

And I run the first code my running this command:

cat TEXTFILE | ./a.out

I run the second code my running this command:

./a.out TEXTFILE

However, I am getting different results. While the first one seeked properly, so it reads the correct text, the second one is not. I want to use the second format, so what did I do wrong?

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what happens if you use fseek with SEEK_SET? –  Keith Nicholas Jan 17 '12 at 1:09
    
also, just as a check, how many read does 'read' return and how many does fread return? –  Keith Nicholas Jan 17 '12 at 1:14
    
Maybe you ought to explain why you are trying to read unsigned ints from a text file. Reading characters works better, strtol() to convert. And no seek, use fgets() –  Hans Passant Jan 17 '12 at 1:15
    
what do u mean how many does it return? –  SuperString Jan 17 '12 at 2:33
    
You should always check system calls for errors. If you did that, you'd know that your lseek() failed and set errno to ESPIPE (illegal seek). –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 17 '12 at 3:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

With the addition of an open(filename,O_RDONLY); call to the first example, both worked fine for me. I suspect your problem is because of the call lseek(0, 100, SEEK_CUR);, which is asking for a seek on standard input. You cannot always seek on standard in - if you have:

 cat file | ./my_program 

Then standard input is a fifo, and you can't seek. If I do this on my system, seek fails by returning -1, with an error of "Illegal seek". This may be the problem you're having, and you might not notice since you don't check the return value of the seek call in your example.

Note that if you have:

 ./my_program < file

Then standard input is a file, and you may seek. On my system, seek returns 100, and the output is correct.


Here is a program you can use to illustrate the return values:

int main(void){ 

  int fd = 0;
  char blah[5];
  printf("Seek moved to this position: %d\n",lseek(fd, 100, SEEK_CUR));
  perror("Seek said");
  printf("Then read read %d bytes\n",read(fd, blah, sizeof(blah)));
  printf("The bytes read were '%c%c%c%c%c'\n",blah[0],blah[1],blah[2],blah[3],blah[4]); 
}                       

And here are two executions:

 $ ./a.out < text
 Seek moved to this position: 100
 Seek said: Success
 Then read read 5 bytes
 The bytes read were '+++.-'

(Those are the correct bytes from position 100 in that file)

$ cat text | ./a.out 
Seek moved to this position: -1
Seek said: Illegal seek
Then read read 5 bytes
The bytes read were '# def'

(Those bytes are the first 5 bytes of the file)


I also noticed that the standard input version was the one you said was working correctly. If you're having trouble with the FILE * version, I suspect the fopen() call is failing, so make sure you check the return value from fopen(). Of course, you can always do this:

FILE *fr = stdin;  

So that you're reading from standard in. However, as you can't always seek on standard in, I'd recommend always opening a file if you plan to seek.

Note that you can't seek on all devices that you can open files on (though you won't have a problem on most systems), so you should always check that the result of a seek() to make sure it succeeded.

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I'm not a 100% sure about the difference, but it seems to be related to pipe vs stdio/file. To illustrate this, I made these 2 different test programs:

exam.c

#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
        char blah[5] = {0,};

        /* we're using stdin instead of pipeline  :( */
        lseek(0, 100, SEEK_CUR);
        read(0, blah, sizeof(blah));

        printf("%c%c%c%c%c\n", blah[0], blah[1], blah[2], blah[3], blah[4]);

        return 0;
}

test.c

#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <stdio.h>

void testA(const char *s)
{
        int f = -1;
        char blah[5] = {0,};

        f = open(s, O_RDONLY);

        if (-1 < f)
        {
                lseek(f, 100, SEEK_CUR);
                read(f, blah, sizeof(blah));
        }

        printf("%c%c%c%c%c\n", blah[0], blah[1], blah[2], blah[3], blah[4]);
}

void testB(const char *s)
{
        FILE *fp = NULL;
        char blah[5] = {0,};

        fp = fopen(s, "r");

        if (fp)
        {
                fseek(fp, 100, SEEK_CUR);
                fread(blah, 1, sizeof(blah), fp);
        }

        printf("%c%c%c%c%c\n", blah[0], blah[1], blah[2], blah[3], blah[4]);
}

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
        testA(argv[1]);
        testB(argv[1]);

        return 0;
}

Then I created some test data.

data.txt

0123456789ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz
0123456789ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz
0123456789ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz
0123456789ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz
0123456789ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz
0123456789ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz
0123456789ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz
0123456789ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz
0123456789ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz
0123456789ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz

When I executed cat ./data.txt | ./exam, the output is

01234

When I executed ./test ./data.txt, I got

bcdef
bcdef

Just FYI, the results remain unchanged even if we replace SEEK_CUR with SEEK_SET.

However, ./exam <./data.txt results in

bcdef

which is legitimate.

I know this is not an acceptable answer without knowing why '0' brings up the data file's contents, but I hope it helps somehow.

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1  
I added an answer explaining the difference between piping and redirecting :) –  Timothy Jones Jan 17 '12 at 3:35
1  
You could - arguably should in this context - check the return status from lseek(), which would give you -1 and set errno to ESPIPE. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 17 '12 at 3:53
    
@TimothyJones +1 Thanks for the explanation! :D ...didn't know stdin is unseekable. –  shinkou Jan 17 '12 at 4:10
    
You're welcome. Note that it's not always unseekable - just sometimes, depending on how it's provided. Generally, I don't think it's good practice to seek on stdin. –  Timothy Jones Jan 17 '12 at 4:14

SEEK_CUR starts from the current position. That is why your first seek works when you are at the beginning of the file. To always seek from the beginning you need to use SEEK_SET instead of SEEK_CUR.

0   SEEK_SET    The beginning of the file
1   SEEK_CUR    The current position
2   SEEK_END    The end of the file
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