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I got yelled at for trying to use the word question in the title so this is what I came up with. At any rate, this is a purely academic question about parameter types.

OK, so here is what I get.

using System;
namespace TypeParamTest 
{
    internal class Program
    {
        private static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            PrintType(1, new object());
            Console.ReadKey();
        }
        static void PrintType<T, Ttwo>(T first, Ttwo second)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(typeof(T) + " : " + typeof(Ttwo));
        }
    }
}

That is clear and unambiguous to me (Astute readers will recognize this as a simple extension of an example found on page 249 of C# in Depth). I totally get what is happening, the compiler says there is some type (to be defined for T and then for Ttwo). What I don't understand is why on page 65 the example only has one type parameter.

List<TOutput> ConvertAll<TOutput>(Converter<T, TOutput> conv);

How does the compiler know about T in this case?

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2  
I'm thinking that the method is contained within a generic class that defines T. –  ChaosPandion Jan 17 '12 at 1:25
2  
+1 Good question, solid title. –  MPelletier Jan 17 '12 at 1:25

1 Answer 1

up vote 9 down vote accepted

We don't have enough information to answer for sure. Maybe T is defined on the surrounding class?

public class SomeClass<T> {
    List<TOutput> ConvertAll<TOutput>(Converter<T, TOutput> conv);
}

If this is an example of List<T>'s ConvertAll method, then my suggestion above is the case.

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Ah, you all beat me too it! That spark just went off in my brain. –  Kenn Jan 17 '12 at 1:26

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