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I want a class to have an enforced static method called GetProduct, so that client code can accept a type and safely call that static method after checking that the passed type implements an interface called ICommandThatHasProduct.

It seems that this is not possible, so now I'm seeking help in finding a way I can achieve this. I know that I could use reflection to see if the type I am passed contains a method called "GetProduct" but I am hoping there is a more object-oriented way (i.e. using inheritance).

Any help will be appreciated! The below code is pseudo-c#, definitely will not compile.

public interface ICommandThatHasProduct
{
    object GetProduct(int id);
}

public abstract class Command : ICommandThatHasProduct
{
    // I want to be able to make the GetProduct method static
    // so that calling code can safely call it
    public static object GetProduct(int id)
    {
        // do stuff with id to get the product
    }

    public object Execute()
    {
        CommandWillExecute();
    }

    public abstract object CommandWillExecute();
}

public class Program
{
    public Program(Type type, int productId)
    {
        if(type == ICommandThatHasProduct)
        {
            // Create the args
            var args = object[1]{ productId };

            // Invoke the GetProduct method and pass the args
            var product = type.InvokeMethod("GetProduct", args);

            //do stuff with product
        }

        throw new Execption("Cannot pass in a Command that does not implement ICommandHasProduct");
    }
}
share|improve this question
4  
static methods don't really apply to general OO concepts. –  M.Babcock Jan 17 '12 at 3:15
    
there is no static inheritance, so reflection is probably the only way –  BrokenGlass Jan 17 '12 at 3:16
1  
possible duplicate of c#: Inherited/interface static member? In fact, almost all these questions addressed this already. –  Ben Voigt Jan 17 '12 at 3:26

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I think your real problem is that you are passing around Types instead of a class of your own. The GetProduct()-method actually belongs on the class that represents the type of command, but of course you cannot add the method on the actual Type. So instead make your own class to represent the type of command.

I guess you are using the Types to construct the actual Commands via reflection. If so, you actually want a 'Factory' instead. (If it does not make sense to make a factory, just make a 'CommandType' object instead).

Try something like this:

public interface IFactory{
  object Create();
}

public interface IFactoryThatHasProduct: IFactory
{
  object GetProduct(int id);
}

public class MyCommand
{
  //...
}

public class MyCommandFactory:IFactoryThatHasProduct
{
  object Create(){
    return new MyCommand();
  }

  object GetProduct(int id){
    return //TODO
  }
}

public class Program
{
  public Program(IFactory factory, int productId)
  {
    // consider just having the method take IFactoryThatHasProduct instead of IFactory
    if(factory is IFactoryThatHasProduct){
      var factoryThatHasProduct = (IFactoryThatHasProduct) factory;
      var product = factoryThatHasProduct.GetProduct(productId);
    }
    else{
      throw new Exception("Cannot pass in a factory that does not implement IFactoryThatHasProduct");
    }
  }
}

}

share|improve this answer

Method does not have to be static. Use a member method instead, and create the usual inheritance tree.

I am guessing you're looking for an abstract factory or a simple factory method pattern implementation in C#.

Keep LSP in mind. It helps to avoid strange-looking inheritance trees.

share|improve this answer

I want a class to have an enforced static method called GetProduct, so that client code can accept a Type object and safely call that static method after checking that the passed type implements an interface.

You're going to be making the call via Reflection, so you're going to have to do the enforcement via Reflection too. The whole point of Reflection is to do work at runtime that the compiler was unable to verify; if what you want is compile-time verification then you're using exactly the wrong tool. Don't use a tool specifically designed to defeat compile-time verification if that is the very thing you want!

I am hoping there is a more object-oriented way (i.e. using inheritance).

You are doing it the object-oriented way. Object-orientation is about passing around units of functionality in the form of objects, and sending them "messages" (aka method calls) that describe what operations you'd like to perform on them, and those "messages" being analyzed in a late-bound fashion. (Usually the late binding is in the form of virtual calls, but late binding by name is fine too.)

Inheritance is a mechanism for sharing code between classes and representing semantic "is a kind of" relationships; why do you feel that inheritance is relevant to your problem?

share|improve this answer

Taking on board the comments about whether this is the right way to go, I'll assume you know what you are doing. Here is a minimal code sample:

using System;
using System.Reflection;

namespace EnforceStaticMethod
{
class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        var objA = GetProduct(typeof (TypeA), 1);
        var objB = GetProduct(typeof (TypeB), 2);

        Console.WriteLine("objA has type: " + objA.GetType());
        Console.WriteLine("objB has type: " + objB.GetType());
    }

    static object GetProduct(Type type, int id)
    {
        var argTypes = new[] {typeof (int)};
        var method = type.GetMethod("GetProduct", BindingFlags.Static | BindingFlags.Public, null, argTypes, null);
        if (method == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentException("Type does not have GetProduct method: " + type);
        }

        var args = new object[] {id};
        return method.Invoke(null, args);
    }
}

class TypeA
{
    public static object GetProduct(int id)
    {
        return new TypeA();
    }
}

class TypeB
{
    public static object GetProduct(int id)
    {
        return new TypeB();
    }
}
}
share|improve this answer

Why do you need to call it staticly? You could do this:

public class Client 
{
    public void DoSomethingWith<T>() where T : ICommandThatHasProduct, new()
    {
        var command = new T();
        var products = command.GetProducts();
    }
}

or just this:

public class Client 
{
    public void DoSomethingWith(ICommandThatHasProduct command)
    { 
        var products = command.GetProducts();
    }
}

You can always pass the instance to the client instead of the type.

share|improve this answer
    
Because the actual implementation of the constructor is quite heavy and I don't want to have to instantiate it just to use that method. –  Chris Paynter Jan 17 '12 at 5:04
    
If you could use that methods as static, you won't be using anything from the constructor, so... just use another class with that code. It will increase the cohesiveness and reduce the coupling. –  ivowiblo Jan 17 '12 at 13:22

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