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I tried the following example program to understand the usage of the makefiles in compilation.

main.c

#include<stdio.h>
#include<functions.h>
int main()
{
 print_hello();
 printf("\nThe Factorial is : %d\n",factorial(5));
 return 0;
}

hello.c

#include<stdio.h>
#include<functions.h>
void print_hello()
{
 printf("\nHello world!\n");
}

factorial.c

#include<stdio.h>
#include<functions.h>
void factorial(int n)
{
 if(n!=1){
  return(n*factorial(n-1));
 }
 else
  return 1;
}

functions.h

#include<stdio.h>
void print_hello();
int factorial(int n);

makefile

exec : ./compile

compile : main.o hello.o factorial.o
  gcc -o compile

main.o : main.c functions.h
  gcc -c main.c

hello.o : hello.c functions.h
  gcc -c hello.c

factorial.o : factorial.c functions.h
  gcc -c factorial.c

Error :

cheetah@desktop:~/make_example$ make compile
gcc -c main.c
main.c:2:22: error: functions.h: No such file or directory
make: *** [main.o] Error 1
cheetah@desktop:~/make_example$ 

EDITED:

gcc -c main.c
gcc -c hello.c
gcc -c factorial.c
gcc -o compile
gcc: no input files
make: *** [compile] Error 1

Please help me understand why is it throwing an error as functions.h not found as I have included it in my makefile.

share|improve this question
1  
Note that functions.h does not give a prototype for print_hello(); it just declares the function as taking an indeterminate (but fixed) number of arguments. To be a prototype in C, you must give void print_hello(void); (though in C++, this would all be different). –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 17 '12 at 4:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Alternative to changing the source, you can include the current directory for header file lookup using -I option of gcc. In that case your makefile rule where you need the header file will look like as follows (assuming the header file is the current directory):

main.o : main.c functions.h
  gcc -c main.c -I./

Again as already pointed out, the error you were facing later during linking was due to missing input files in the compile target. For this again there is alternative. You can make use of $^ in the makefile for all you depencies. In which you compile rule will look like:

compile:main.o hello.o factorial.o
    gcc -o compile $^

See this link for some information regarding makefile macros.
Side notes:

  1. Guards are missing your header file
  2. There is mismatch in declaration & definition of factorial function.
  3. As already mentioned by Jonathan Leffler be adviced about the prototype of print_hello

Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer

Replace

#include<functions.h>

with

#include"functions.h"

A detailed explanation is here: http://www.geekinterview.com/question_details/3379

And finally, object files are missing at the linking stage.

compile : main.o hello.o factorial.o
  gcc -o compile main.o hello.o factorial.o
share|improve this answer
    
If I read it correctly, that article only explains that the two styles of inclusion search locations in different orders. Does that explain why the first one doesn't end up finding functions.h, assuming it's in the current directory? –  Dan Fego Jan 17 '12 at 4:19
    
Thanks . Now i'm getting error as no i/p files.. dunno what i missed to include –  Angus Jan 17 '12 at 4:24
    
Why remove functions.h from the makefile - it should be in the dependency list for building the object file. –  Adrian Cornish Jan 17 '12 at 4:25
    
@DanFego Because, I suppose, the functions.h doesn't locate in the default search location. And generally, the dubbed default search location is usually your standard system include directory. –  shinkou Jan 17 '12 at 4:26
1  
@shinkou What if you define a struct in a header, then at some time change its definition so that it takes more/less space. If the object files depend on the proper headers, everything gets recompiled as necessary. If they don't and you change some source files including the changed header but not others, only the changed files get recompiled, resulting in breakage. –  Daniel Fischer Jan 17 '12 at 11:10

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