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I've got a collection of strings, and I need to know the first index where they all differ. I can think of two ways to do this: (the following pseudo code is just off the top of my head and may be heavily bug-laden)

First Way:

var minLength = [go through all strings finding min length];
var set = new set()
for(i=0;i<minlength;i++)
{
  for(str in strings)
  {
    var substring = str.substring(0,i);
    if(set.contains(substring))
      break; // not all different yet, increment i
    set.add(substring)
  }
  set.clear(); // prepare for next length of substring
}

This strikes me as gross because of the use of a set data structure where it seems like one should not be needed.

Second Way:

var minLength = [go through all strings finding min length];
strings.sort();
for(i=0;i<minlength;i++)
{
  boolean done = true;
  char last = null;
  for(str in strings)
  {
    char c = str[i];
    if(c == last)
    {
      // not all different yet, increment i
      done = false;
      break;
    }
    last = c;
  }
  if(done)
    return i;
}

But it annoys me that I have to run the sort first, because the sorting algorithm, by its very nature, has access to the information that I'm looking for.

Surely there must be a more efficient way than what I have listed above. Eventually I'd like to abstract it out to any type of array, but that will be trivial and it's simpler to think of it as a string problem.

Any help?

**UPDATE: I apparently didn't explain myself very well. If my strings are ["apple", "banana", "cucumber", "banking"], I want the function to return 3, because there were two strings ("banana" and "banking") that matched through index 0, 1, and 2, so 3 is the first index where they are all unique.

As Daniel mentioned below, a better way to state my needs is that: "I want to find index i where calling substring(0,i) on all my strings will result in all unique values."**

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Is it me, or does the second program find the first index at which each string has a unique character, while the first looks for the first index i at while the substring(0, i) is unique for each string? –  Stephan202 May 20 '09 at 16:41
1  
It is very unclear what you mean by "the first index where they all differ" for a collection of strings. Can you please clarify what that means, and what you're trying to find? Also, some information about what language you're using would be critical, as there are many different ways to solve this sort of thing depending upon language. –  Paul Sonier May 20 '09 at 16:41
    
Consider {111, 123, 223}. Then the first program find index 1, while the second finds no index. –  Stephan202 May 20 '09 at 16:43
    
I assume he is looking for an index i, such that substring(0, i) is unique for all strings. –  Daniel Brückner May 20 '09 at 16:50
    
Yes, Daniel. That's a much better way of describing my requirements. –  Erik R. May 20 '09 at 16:52

7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use the set as you proposed, that's exactly the right thing to do.

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have you looked at a Patricia trie? (Java implementation available on google code)

alt text

Build the trie, then traverse the data structure to find the maximum string position of all the internal nodes (black dots in the function above).

This seems like it should be an O(n) operation. I'm not sure whether your set implementation is O(n) or not -- it "smells" like O(n2) but I'm not sure.

share|improve this answer

Here's my solution in Python:

words = ["apple", "banana", "cucumber", "banking"]

for i in range(len(min(words))):
    d = defaultdict(int)
    for word in words:
        d[word[i]] += 1
    if max(d.values()) == 1:
        return i

I didn't write in anything to handle the case where no minimum index is found by the time you reach the end of the shortest word, but I'm sure you get the idea.

share|improve this answer

Agree w/ gs, use of set is appropriate. Your p-code translated to python, lightly tested:

minlen = min( len( x ) for x in strings )
myset = set()
for i in range( minlen ):
    for s in strings:
        sub = s[:i+1]
        if sub in myset:
            break
        myset.add( sub )
    if len( myset ) == len( strings ):
        print i
        break
    myset.clear()

With each iteration through strings, you need to check for existence of a value against all previously encountered values. That says hash- or set-type structure to me.

share|improve this answer

This is untested, but here's my attempt. (I may be making it more complicated than I have to, but I think it's a different way to look at it.)

The basic idea is to compile groups of items that match at the first element, then find the max unique index for each group, checking elements at each successive index.

int FirstUniqueIndex<T>(IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> myArrayCollection)
{
    //just an overload so you don't have to specify index 0 all the time
    return FirstUniqueIndex(myArrayCollection, 0);
}

int FirstUniqueIndex<T>(IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> myArrayCollection, int StartIndex)
{
    /* Group the current collection by the element at StartIndex, and
     * return a collection of these groups. Additionally, we're only interested
     * in the groups with more than one element, so only get those.*/

    var groupsWithMatches = from var item in myArrayCollection //for each item in the collection (called "item")
                            where item.Length > StartIndex //that are long enough
                            group by item[StartIndex] into g //group them by the element at StartIndex, and call the group "g"
                            where g.Skip(1).Any() //only want groups with more than one element
                            select g; //add the group to the collection

    /* Now "groupsWithMatches" is an enumeration of groups of inner matches of
     * your original arrays. Let's process them... */

    if(groupsWithMatches.Any()) 
        //some matches were found - check the next index for each group
        //(get the maximum unique index of all the matched groups)
        return groupsWithMatches.Max(group => FirstUniqueIndex(group, StartIndex + 1));
    else
        //no matches found, all unique at this index
        return StartIndex;
}


And for the non-LINQ version of the above (I'll change it to use a List collection, but any collection will do). I'll even remove the lambda. Again untested, so try not to aim sharp implements in my direction.

int FirstUniqueIndex<T>(List<List<T>> myArrayCollection, int StartIndex)
{
    /* Group the current collection by the element at StartIndex, and
     * return a collection of these groups. Additionally, we're only interested
     * in the groups with more than one element, so only get those.*/

    Dictionary<T, List<List<T>>> groupsWithMatches = new Dictionary<T, List<List<T>>>();

    //group all the items by the element at StartIndex
    foreach(var item in myArrayCollection)
    {
        if(item.Count > StartIndex)
        {
            List<List<T>> group;
            if(!groups.TryGetValue(item[StartIndex], out group))
            {
                //new group, so make it first
                group = new List<List<T>>();
                groups.Add(item[StartIndex], group);
            }

            group.Add(Item);
        }
    }

    /* Now "groups" is an enumeration of groups of inner matches of
     * your original arrays. Let's get the groups with more than one item. */

    List<List<List<T>>> groupsWithMatches = new List<List<List<T>>>(groups.Count);

    foreach(List<List<T> group in groupsWithMatches)
    {
        if(group.Count > 1)
            groupsWithMatches.Add(group);
    }

    if(groupsWithMatches.Count > 0)
    {
        //some matches were found - check the next index for each group
        //(get the maximum unique index of all the matched groups)

        int max = -1;
        foreach(List<List<T>> group in groupsWithMatches)
        {
            int index = FirstUniqueIndex(group, StartIndex + 1);
            max = index > max ? index : max;
        }
        return max;
    }
    else
    {
        //no matches found, all unique at this index
        return StartIndex;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Can I ask what language that is? Is the groupWithMatches some kind of predicate definition? It seems like recursion is probably not the way to go here, but perhaps that depends on language and compiler. –  Erik R. May 20 '09 at 17:20
    
C#, and yes, groupWithMatches is a LINQ query (basically a predicate definition). I'll revise my answer to explain the algorithm a little more. As for which way to go, I think it depends on the particular collection. This method is probably faster with a long collection where only a few items actually match each other, since it disregards items which don't match each other on each pass (instead of checking each item for uniqueness at every index). –  lc. May 20 '09 at 17:27
    
I had the same idea but I didn't want to give a LINQ answer ... it's C#. –  Daniel Brückner May 20 '09 at 17:28
    
It's C#, and I like this approach a lot. –  mquander May 20 '09 at 17:28
2  
@Erik R.: A summary of the algorithm is: Start at index 0. For index N, separate all the strings into buckets based on their Nth character. If no bucket has multiple strings, then return N. Else, take each bucket with multiple strings individually and apply the function to that bucket on index N+1; return the maximum of all the results thereby obtained. –  mquander May 20 '09 at 18:45

You should be able to do this without sorting, and with only looking at each character in each string once in the worst case.

here is a ruby script that puts the index to the console:

mystrings = ["apple", "banana", "cucumber", "banking"]
minlength = getMinLengthString(mystrings) #not defined here

char_set = {}

(0..minlength).each do |char_index|
  char_set[mystrings[0][char_index].chr] = 1
  (1..mystrings.length).each do |string_index|
    comparing_char = mystrings[string_index][char_index].chr
    break if char_set[comparing_char]
    if string_index == (mystrings.length - 1) then
      puts string_index
      exit
    else
      char_set[comparing_char] = 1
    end     
  end
  char_set.clear
end
puts minlength

the result is 3.

Here's the same general snippet in C#, if it is more legible for you:

string[] mystrings = { "apple", "banana", "cucumber", "banking" };

//defined elsewhere...
int minlength = GetMinStringLengthFromStringArray(mystrings);

Dictionary<char, int> charSet = new Dictionary<char, int>();

for (int char_index = 0; char_index < minlength; char_index++)
{
    charSet.Add(mystrings[0][char_index], 1);

    for (int string_index = 1; string_index < mystrings.Length; string_index++)
    {
        char comparing_char = mystrings[string_index][char_index];

        if (charSet.ContainsKey(comparing_char))
        {
             break;
        }
        else
        {
             if (string_index == mystrings.Length - 1)
             {
                  Console.Out.WriteLine("Index is: " + string_index.ToString());
                  return;
             }
             else
             {
                  charSet.Add(comparing_char, 1);
             }
        }
    }

    charSet.Clear();
}
Console.Out.WriteLine("Index is: " + minlength.ToString());
share|improve this answer
int i = 0;
while(true)
{
    Set set = new Set();
    for(int j = 0; j < strings.length; j++)
    {
         if(i >= strings[j].length) return i;
         String chr = strings[j].charAt(i);
         if(set.hasElement(chr))
             break;
         else
             set.addElement(chr);
    }
    if(set.size() == strings.length)
        return i;
    i++;
}

Gotta check preconditions first.

EDIT: Using a set now. Changed langauge.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice "set.size() == strings.length" to check if you've made it all the way through the strings. So my initial instincts were correct? –  Erik R. May 20 '09 at 17:15
    
I believe that using a set and then checking the number of elements in it to be the easiest option. I'm actually going to edit this again to use a function on the inside. –  CookieOfFortune May 20 '09 at 17:18

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