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I have an array. One of the values in that array responses[1] is an integer. This integer can be from 1 to whatever number you want. I need to get the last number in the integer and determine based on that number if I should end the number with 'st', 'nd', 'rd', or 'th'. How do I do that? I tried:

var placeEnding;
var placeInt = response[1]; //101
var stringInt = placeInt.toString();
var lastInt = stringInt.charAt(stringInt.length-1);
if (lastInt == '1'){
    placeEnding = 'st';
} else if (lastInt == '2'){
    placeEnding = 'nd';
} else if (lastInt == '3'){
    placeEnding = 'rd';
} else {
    placeEnding = 'th';
}

but that did not work. Every time I tried printing placeEnding it was always 'th' no matter if it should have been 'st', 'rd', or 'nd'. When I tried printing placeInt, stringInt, or lastInt they all printed as " instead of the number. Why is this so? When I print responses[1] later on in the script I have no problem getting the right answer.

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1  
response[1] or responses[1]..? –  Sudhir Jan 17 '12 at 5:12
    
@Sudhir wow! thanks. That is exactly what was wrong. responses[1]. –  chromedude Jan 17 '12 at 5:14
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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If all you want is the last digit, just use the modulus operator: 123456 % 10 == 6
No need to bother with string conversions or anything.

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+1 Is probably more efficient than my solution. I updated my answer, but see my warning about decimal points. –  Joseph Silber Jan 17 '12 at 5:23
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Here you go:

var ends = {
    '1': 'st',
    '2': 'nd',
    '3': 'rd'
}

response[1] += ends[ response[1].toString().split('').pop() ] || 'th';

As others have pointed out, using modulus 10 is more efficient:

response[1] += ends[ parseInt(response[1], 10) % 10 ] || 'th';

However, this'll break if the number has a decimal in it. If you think it might, use the previous solution.

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What would you call the ordinal corresponding to, say, 21.173, anyway? "Twenty-one-point-one-seven-third"? "Twenty-first-point-one-seven-three"? Fortunately, I suspect this is not an issue that comes up very often in practice. –  Ilmari Karonen Jan 17 '12 at 22:19
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In my rhino console.

js> (82434).toString().match(/\d$/)
4
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+1 for TIMTOWTDI. –  Ilmari Karonen Jan 17 '12 at 22:21
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Alternate way to get lastInt is:

 var lastInt = parseInt(stringInt)%10;
switch lastInt {
    case 1:
        placeEnding = 'st';
        break;
    case 2:
        placeEnding = 'nd';
        break;
    case 3:
        placeEnding = 'rd';
        break;
    default:
        placeEnding = 'th';
}
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