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I was trying to make Tic Tac Toe game for the monthly tutorial and wrote this code to make a box first:

box :: [String]
box = ["0 | 1 | 2",
       "---------",
       "3 | 4 | 5",
       "---------",
       "6 | 7 | 8"]

I get this output in GHCi:

["0 | 1 | 2\n","---------\n","3 | 4 | 5\n","---------\n","6 | 7 | 8\n"]

I wanted to get:

 0 | 1 | 2
 ---------
 3 | 4 | 5
 ---------
 6 | 7 | 8

How can I print the grid like this?

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1  
What function are you using to output it? –  dave4420 Jan 17 '12 at 6:32
    
I am not using any function but working at GHCi prompt –  Rog Matthews Jan 17 '12 at 6:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Try something like:

box = unlines $ ["0 | 1 | 2",
                 "---------",
                 "3 | 4 | 5",
                 "---------",
                 "6 | 7 | 8"]

Then output the box using putStr:

main = putStr box

What unlines does is take a list of strings and join them together using newlines. It basically treats the list of strings as a list of lines and turns them into a single string.

putStr just prints the string to STDOUT. If you used print or GHCi to look at the string instead, newlines would be rendered as \n rather than actual newlines. This happens because the show instance of a String is designed to serialize the string as you would have inputted it rather than printing it. Both print and GHCi use show before outputting to STDOUT.

If you are at the GHCi prompt and want to see what the string actually looks like, you can use putStr directly:

*Main> putStr box
0 | 1 | 2
---------
3 | 4 | 5
---------
6 | 7 | 8
*Main>
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@dave4420: Wow, I was not paying attention! Thanks for fixing my error. –  Tikhon Jelvis Jan 17 '12 at 6:26
1  
Don't thank me, thank my insomnia. You can also improve your answer by either being consistent about using putStr/putStrLn, or by noting the difference between them. –  dave4420 Jan 17 '12 at 6:30
    
Ooh, good point. I meant to use putStr throughout, but I'm so used to putStrLn that it just gets typed by instinct :) –  Tikhon Jelvis Jan 17 '12 at 6:33
    
@ Tikhon Can you please tell me if there is any way in which i can give input of Maybe Int and convert it into Int. I was working on the following code. code moves = do putStrLn " Enter the number" number <- readLn :: IO Int print number findposition number box = findIndex (==number) box :: Int –  Rog Matthews Jan 17 '12 at 11:27
    
@user: You should ask a new question for that. –  ehird Jan 17 '12 at 12:13

Another approach is

main = mapM_ putStrLn box

mapM :: Monad m => (a -> m b) -> [a] -> m [b] is the analogue of map, but for monadic functions, its underscored cousin, mapM_ :: Monad m => (a -> m b) -> [a] -> m () doesn't collect the return values and can thus be more efficient. If the return values are uninteresting, as for putStrLn s, mapM_ is the better choice.

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@ Daniel Can you please tell me if there is any way in which i can give input of Maybe Int and convert it into Int. I was working on the following code. code moves = do putStrLn " Enter the number" number <- readLn :: IO Int print number findposition number box = findIndex (==number) box :: Int –  Rog Matthews Jan 17 '12 at 11:29
    
@user If you have a reasonable default for the Nothing case, use maybe :: b -> (a -> b) -> Maybe a -> b or Data.Maybe.fromMaybe :: a -> Maybe a -> a. –  Daniel Fischer Jan 17 '12 at 16:17

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