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I have a code like this

Map<String, List> searchMap = new HashMap<String, List>();
for(int i=0; i<something.size(); i++){
 List<String> list = new ArrayList<String>();
 list = getResult(...);
 ...
 searchMap.put(differentkey, list);
}

Each time I am creating new List in loop. How to avoid creating new list in loop.

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We can't tell from your code what you're doing (what is i for? What is getResult?). It is only clear, that = new ArrayList<String> ();\n list can be ommited, since list get's then bound to getResult (...);. –  user unknown Jan 17 '12 at 7:08

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Simply don't create the List at all since it is not even used in the code you have shown.

List<String> list = getResult(...);
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Will it not its taking reference of list in map. When I try to return or iterate over map. It may have different result in it. –  Imran Tariq Jan 17 '12 at 7:06
    
Also, make sure ArrayList is the appropriate type of list to create. It might be that creating a LinkedList, for example, would be more efficient. I wonder if random access to this List is really needed? –  Mike Jan 17 '12 at 7:07
    
@imrantariq: We don't know what getResult() does, which makes it harder to understand what's going on. If this code doesn't work, you need to give us more information - because it should. Of course, if you need to pass a list into getResult() then that confuses things slightly - but you need to give us that information. Please read tinyurl.com/so-hints –  Jon Skeet Jan 17 '12 at 7:09

Why would you want to? It looks like you want as many lists as you have keys, given that your map is from a key to a list... so you want that many distinct lists.

In particular, you don't want to just clear the list on each iteration - as otherwise each map entry will refer to the same list.

Now you don't have to create an empty list which you then ignore - you can assign the value of getResult() immediately to the variable, in the declaration:

List<String> list = getResult(...);

That's likely to still be creating a new list on each iteration (unless getResult() returns an existing one) but that's probably what you want anyway.

Note that there's no benefit in declaring the list variable outside the loop - the variable declaration doesn't affect performance, but it's generally a good idea to limit a variable's scope as much as possible - so I'd keep the declaration where it is.

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yes you are right. –  Imran Tariq Jan 17 '12 at 7:07

Try this instead:

Map<String, List> searchMap = new HashMap<String, List>();
for(int i=0; i<something.size(); i++){
    List<String> list = getResult(...);
    ...
    searchMap.put(differentkey, list);
}

There's no need to construct a new list.

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Curse you and your 12 second advantage! –  Paul Jan 17 '12 at 7:07
    
@Paul Hah! Beat you for fourth place. :) –  Ted Hopp Jan 17 '12 at 7:12
Map<String, List> searchMap = new HashMap<String, List>();
List<String> list = new ArrayList<String>();
for(int i=0; i<something.size(); i++){
    list = getResult(...);
    ...
    searchMap.put(differentkey, list);
}

On the 4th line (list = getResult(...);) you're assigning a new object to your listvariable. So there's no need to create new list before that. Your variable will be replaced anyway.

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1  
Why does he need to construct a new ArrayList at all? –  Paul Jan 17 '12 at 7:08
    
And why would he want to widen the scope of the list variable? –  Jon Skeet Jan 17 '12 at 7:09
    
Maybe he uses that after 4th line. We don't know what he means under "..." (5th line) –  shift66 Jan 17 '12 at 7:10
for(int i=0; i<something.size(); i++){
 List<String> list = new ArrayList<String>();
 list = getResult(...);

is equivalent to

for(int i=0; i<something.size(); i++){
 List<String> list = getResult(...);

But I'm not sure, whether you're really searching for this.

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