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I'm a newbie in C programming. I have this issue that I don't understand. It seems that strings under windows are treated in a completely different way respect to linux, why?

Thant's my code

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h> // compare strings
void addextname(char *str1, char *str2, char *nome1){
    int i,j;
    i = 0;
    while (str1[i]!='.') {
        nome1[i] = str1[i];
        i++;
    }
    j = 0;
    while (str2[j]!='\0') {
        nome1[i] = str2[j];
        i++;
        j++;
    }
}

int main()
{
    char str1[9]="file.stl";
    char str2[9]="name.stl";
    int len1 = strlen(str1);
    int len2 = strlen(str2);
    char nome1[len1+len2+1];
    addextname(str1,str2,nome1);
    printf("%s  %s  %s\n",str1,str2,nome1);
    return 0;
}

My purpose is to read an input filename within its extension (.stl) and add some chars to it keeping that extension. Under linux I have no problem, under windows instead the output filenames are saved unproperly. My compiling line is

gcc modstr.c -std=c99 -o strings

I really appreciate an answer to that!

share|improve this question
    
@qiao which line did you edited, because the code seems like the previous – Nicholas Jan 17 '12 at 9:29
    
An indentation problem on a bracket which split the codeblock into two seperate ones. Just for better formatting :) – qiao Jan 17 '12 at 9:32
    
@qiao yeah! I thought it was something on my code but I figured later that the answer was below :) – Nicholas Jan 17 '12 at 9:54
up vote 10 down vote accepted

You're not 0-terminating nome1. Try:

nome1[i] = 0; /* After the second while. */
share|improve this answer
2  
...and you should change while (str1[i]!='.') to while (str1[i]!='.'&&str1[i]!='\0') since otherwise addextname will crash when passed a filename without extension as first argument. – Axel Jan 17 '12 at 8:19
2  
And you should start searching from the right, since a filename can contain more than one period. – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jan 17 '12 at 8:20
2  
@Axel, Ignacio Good call :-) Or maybe just use strrchr ? – cnicutar Jan 17 '12 at 8:21
    
@cnicutar thank you so much. It worked perfectly. Can you please tell me why I have to put a zero at the end instead of a terminate character '\0', which should be included in the second char. – Nicholas Jan 17 '12 at 9:35
    
@Nicholas If you watch closely the second while doesn't actually store the last \0. – cnicutar Jan 17 '12 at 9:47

Your have created the array nome1 but have not furnished it with anything. Is it psychic?

share|improve this answer
    
I've just initialized nome1 memory address and in the addextname I "fill" that memory address. Am I right? – Nicholas Jan 17 '12 at 9:30

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