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Breaking out of a nested loop

I have this code

foreach (___)
{
    foreach (___)
    {
        foreach (___)
        {
            if (condition)
            {
                //break out of all loops
            }
        }
    }
}

But break only "breaks" the most inner loop (sorry for my english) and I want to leave them all...

I was thinking about :

  1. GOTO, but I've always been told to not use it
  2. A sort of boolean-flag

Is there any more elegant way ? like provided by C# ?

Thanks in advance for any help !

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marked as duplicate by V4Vendetta, Tim, wim, LarsTech, CodesInChaos Jan 17 '12 at 13:02

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
for (int loops) { break; } –  stigok Jan 17 '12 at 8:42
    
Clever, but it will only break out of it's own for loop after the first iteration. –  Robert Rouhani Jan 17 '12 at 8:45
    
@RobertRouhani a joke. Obviously not funny at all. –  stigok Jan 17 '12 at 8:46
2  
Just use goto –  kizzx2 Jan 17 '12 at 11:46
3  
I never ever had that many nested loops in a function nor need to break out of that many. Perhaps rewriting the code the solution. Also learn to use the Contains function (from linq). –  acidzombie24 Jan 17 '12 at 11:55

9 Answers 9

up vote 48 down vote accepted

A very elegant solution to this is to move the entire nest of loops to a separate method and return; when you want to break out of all loops.

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5  
This may not work if you are accessing a bunch of local variables from within the loops, though. –  Robert Rouhani Jan 17 '12 at 8:42
2  
@TomTom: which reason is that? –  Groo Jan 17 '12 at 9:15
2  
@RobertRouhani +1 to offset a specious and unexplained downvote –  Gayot Fow Jan 17 '12 at 10:14
5  
-1 for not using goto –  Lohoris Jan 17 '12 at 10:58
4  
+1 for refactoring to avoid high nesting. –  Anton Jan 17 '12 at 11:17

A goto is perfectly fine here:

foreach (___)
{
    foreach (___)
    {
        if (condition)
        {
            goto done;
        }
    }
}
done: ;
share|improve this answer
37  
+1 for not being afraid! :) –  leppie Jan 17 '12 at 8:42
17  
See Cargo Cult Programming. I claim that peole downvoting this don't really understand why goto is considered harmful and just avoid it because they have heard the goto is evil mantra often enough (which is true in principle, but only in principle). –  Heinzi Jan 17 '12 at 8:46
3  
Other than refactoring to use a method, I haven't seen a cleaner and more readable solution than a goto to solve this. –  John N Jan 17 '12 at 9:06
4  
Goto done properly! –  HTDutchy Jan 17 '12 at 9:15
4  
@Heinzi, using goto may be fine here, but you will eventually waste a lot of your time arguing about it with your colleagues. It's better to refactor this into a separate function. –  avakar Jan 17 '12 at 10:19

The best way is probably to refactor to smaller methods with return statements. But if you need a lot of variables in scope you can always use a delegate.

   Action work = delegate
        {
            foreach (___)
            {
                 foreach (___)
                 {
                       foreach (___)
                       {
                            if (condition)
                            {
                                 return;
                            }
                       }
                  }
             }

        };

  work();
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8  
That's a really nasty way to circumvent goto. :-D It takes more time to realize that the return only exits the anonymous method. –  Groo Jan 17 '12 at 9:11
    
@Groo For sure, this is only a edge case solution to Robert Rouhani´s own comment on his accepted answer. –  Glenn Jan 17 '12 at 9:15
    
For extra sneakiness, I would omit the variable and simply invoke the delegate after declaration: delegate { ... }(); :-D Only kidding, it's perfectly valid as any other example here. I would still probably extract it to a method, although three nested foreach loops can most likely be refactored using LINQ or something else. –  Groo Jan 17 '12 at 9:28
    
@Groo why nasty? Having an explicit label makes it possible to jump to it from some other place (I was told); here the explicit label is eliminated, so, nice, not? And I kinda like your second suggestion too, eliminating another explicit one-use name. BTW just as aside, Common Lisp has named scopes and return-from can escape from any named scope, not only that of a method (function). –  Will Ness Jan 17 '12 at 10:00

Years ago, when I was in school, we had informatics with a pretty out of the books stupid teacher. One rule was "no goto". I had an algorithm with multiple loops that grew to many times the size without goto.

There are good reasons, and breaking out of multiple loops is one.

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Stupid pupils listening to stupid teachers are the reason we are stuck with these so-called "programmers" which are religiously afraid of using the correct tool for the job. I despise them very much. –  Lohoris Jan 17 '12 at 11:08

Maybe this is the only valid reason to use goto.

share|improve this answer
1  
There may be many valid reasons, this is the most widespread one. –  Lohoris Jan 17 '12 at 11:03
    
@Lohoris: how about you add an actual answer with your opinion on that matter, show a couple of those valid reasons, and get some peer review from the community? So far, all you've done is called other people stupid because they don't share your opinion. I wouldn't want a coder on my team with such absolute attitude, no matter what side of this religious debate you represented. –  Groo Jan 17 '12 at 12:34
    
@Groo: why should I add an answer when there already is a perfectly valid one? The goal of this site is not to boost enlarge your e-penis, it is to give answers to people who need them. –  Lohoris Jan 17 '12 at 12:41
    
goto is usually acceptable in other cases where you need forms of control flow that are not directly or conveniently supported in your language. Common examples include exception handling (in languages without exceptions built in), state machines and coroutines. –  hugomg Jan 17 '12 at 13:02
    
@missingno: here we're talking about C#, so my answer depends from this. I really don't understand downvotes here... –  Marco Jan 17 '12 at 13:06
bool bLoopBreak = false;

foreach (___)
{
    foreach (___)
    {
        foreach (___)
        {
            if (condition)
            {
                bLoopBreak = true;
                break;
                //break out of all loops
            }
        }
        if (bLoopBreak) break;
    }
    if (bLoopBreak) break;
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1, because it's the nicest example for the Boolean flag solution in this thread, but note that the question asked for "a more elegant way than a Boolean flag", so, technically, this is not an answer. –  Heinzi Jan 17 '12 at 9:01
    
not really maintainable code.. go for the function+return solution instead. –  Jay Jan 17 '12 at 10:21
2  
If I ever meet a horror like this one, I'd just scrap the file and do it over again. –  Lohoris Jan 17 '12 at 11:02
1  
@Lohoris you can scrap whatever u'd like, I'm posting here not because I'm getting paid for, I'm posting here because people MIGHT find my answers useful. If it doesn't suit you, you're more than welcome to ignore it. –  Shai Jan 17 '12 at 11:24
2  
I spare the downvote here but I hate to see code that is more complicated, error prone and slower just to avoid a perfectly fine language construct only because of its bad reputation. –  x4u Jan 17 '12 at 11:29

Don't be afraid to use goto in a case like this. break and continue are just syntactic sugar for goto, and is sparingly and commented correctly it can make code clearer than lots of nested checks to see if you should stop looping.

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1  
You’re dead wrong about “syntactic sugar”. They are semantically checked, scoped and compiler ensured “sugar”. Just as any if and for loop also contains a “goto”. This is no reason at all to defend goto in code. –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 17 '12 at 10:22
    
@KonradRudolph goto is semantically checked, scoped, and compiler ensured. They're quite unlike the forms in some languages, and much of Dijkstra's complaints about goto is not possible in C#. Indeed, it wouldn't match the "present form" he attacked. –  Jon Hanna Jan 17 '12 at 11:50
    
@Jon True but not even remotely to the same extent as break or continue, both of which are strictly tied to a scoping construct and serve one purpose only. –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 17 '12 at 11:53
    
@KonradRudolph goto is just as strictly tied to a scoping construct, albeit a larger one. Can you think of a way to do what goto does in the method at line 575 of github.com/hackcraft/Ariadne/blob/master/Collections/… with the same performance? I wouldn't use that often, but there are times when squeezing every bit out makes sense. –  Jon Hanna Jan 17 '12 at 12:01
    
@Jon I never said (in this thread) never to use goto. In particular, manual TCO is a good reason to use it, as you have obviously realised yourself. Still, this is a very low-level reason and I’d argue that the only good reasons ever to use goto are low-level. –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 17 '12 at 12:24

PHP lets you do this:

foreach (___)
{
    foreach (___)
    {
        foreach (___)
        {
            break 3; // get out of all 3 loops
        }
    }
}

I don't know a whole lot about C# but it may have a similar feature.

share|improve this answer
    
No, it doesn't have that feature –  Marco Jan 17 '12 at 10:02
2  
this is a goto masquerading as a break –  Gayot Fow Jan 17 '12 at 10:19
3  
break is a goto masquerading as a break; –  SWeko Jan 17 '12 at 10:35
1  
Code like this is prone to horrible errors: if you add a loop in-between everything breaks, and good luck finding what happened! –  Lohoris Jan 17 '12 at 11:06

Just to throw an alternative in there: You could also throw an exception inside the loop. In C#/Java/Python this is reasonably cheap to do. (In C++, not so much.)

Note that Python has a StopIteration exception for a similar case, so it's not unheard of, although it might be a bit unorthodox in C#-land. ;)

Sometimes, you get the exception for free, and thus it can be used, but you'd better document it if you are taking that approach.

try {
    foreach (___) {
        foreach (___) {
            if(your condition true)  {
                throw new IterationDone(); // or use a singleton to avoid allocating
            }
        }
    }
    // not found
catch (IterationDone e) {
    // yay    
}

I've made the answer a community wiki, so that it can be seen and discussed. (I don't advocate it as the first and best solution, it's just A solution, and thus deserves to be here...)

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5  
oh the horrible extremes people will do to avoid using goto... No matter how "cheap" it is, it is just semantically wrong. An exception should only be thrown when an error has occurred. –  CashCow Jan 17 '12 at 10:51
    
While it is foolish to do that to avoid a goto, it is actually the only barely elegant solution I've encountered so far. If I need a goto and the stupid language doesn't have it, I'd do it this way. –  Lohoris Jan 17 '12 at 11:05
1  
Actually throwing an exception is a few orders of magnitude slower in C# and Java than using goto in C# or a labled break in Java. –  x4u Jan 17 '12 at 11:32
    
@x4u: sure, I was considering only how good the code looked, here. And, barring goto (which just is the correct answer), this is the only one that looks remotely readable (that is, without giving you the urge to punch the coder in the face). –  Lohoris Jan 17 '12 at 12:47
    
@CashCow: First, It's not used for errors in all cases, as I said. Second, sometimes the orders of magnitude aren't important compared to the real work, and if you get the exception for free it might not be too bad. Finally, I was just trying to mention a solution that no-one else has given. Sometimes people go to horrible extremes to avoid exceptions too... ;) –  Macke Jan 17 '12 at 17:14