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I've started my application as a normal user, however sometimes I'll need to start an elevated process which starts another application. The other application, which is started, is in a sub folder called Executables. All users have full access to the files in the the current directory and sub directories.

The code I'm using:

    public bool CreateElevatedProcess(ActionData data, bool log)
    {
        if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(data.Arguments) && NormalUser.HasCredentials)
        {
            _proc = new Process
            {
                StartInfo =
                {
                    Verb = "runas",
                    FileName = data.Filename,
                    //WorkingDirectory = data.File.DirectoryName,
                    Arguments = data.Arguments,
                    UseShellExecute = false,
                    CreateNoWindow = true,
                    WindowStyle = ProcessWindowStyle.Hidden,
                    UserName = NormalUser.Name,
                    Password = GetSecureString(NormalUser.Password),
                    Domain = NormalUser.Domain
                }
            };
            return true;
        }
        return false;
    }

    private bool StartProcess()
    {
        if (_proc != null)
        {
            try
            {
                _proc.Start();

                _proc.WaitForExit();

                return true;
            }
            catch (Win32Exception ex)
            {
                        // throws win32exception due to directory name is invalid or the specified file not found
            }
        }
        return false;
    }

I've tried setting the WorkingDirectory option, but I'm unsure whether it works due to UseShellExecute is set to false.

What I'm experiencing: When I'm running the my application on the development computer, everything works fine. I've even copied the folder outside of Visual Studio and into a TEMP folder on C:\ without problems. However, on a different computer I'll experience either the directory name is invalid or the specified file is not found error. In all likelyhood it's an user right problem, however, all users have full access ...

How do I properly start an elevated process with a file from a subdirectory?

Adding an example:

The filename property gets: Executables\rc.exe

The argument property gets: 1 lester \mrburns

The filename property only gets a subfolder path instead of the full path, due to the fact that the parent path might be restricted.

share|improve this question
    
If not sure what "the parent path might be restricted." is meant to mean. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jan 17 '12 at 10:04
    
It means that the parent path might have restrictions for non admin users. Lets say you have a partition U: which is restricted for users. However, the users have access to subfolders on the root of U. The reason for the restriction might be to avoid letting the users see all content on the root of U: –  Verzada Jan 17 '12 at 10:34
    
look up "Bypass Traverse Checking" - only insane admins disable this from being applied to every user, and it means that the only permission checks that are applied are those permissions on the file itself - if they can run the file, they can run the file, and no permission checks are performed back to the root of the drive. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jan 17 '12 at 11:23
    
I'm asking my coworkers about that very setting, hopefully I'll get some usefull answers from them :D But essentially I can access a file by the filname property with only: Execute\rc.exe instead of lets say C:\Program Files(x86)\<My Application>\Executables\rc.exe? The Process class doesn't do anything iffy with the path? –  Verzada Jan 17 '12 at 13:36
    
Testing with procmon. The path is correct, however I get the win32exception with the following error message: "The directory name is invalid". –  Verzada Jan 17 '12 at 14:52

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