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The following part of the documentation for ArrayList does not seem correct to me:

The size, isEmpty, get, set, iterator, and listIterator operations run in constant time.

Now set is defined as:

set(int index, E element)
Replaces the element at the specified position in this list with the specified element.

So this could be used to add an element in the middle of the ArrayList and cause the rest of the elements to shift.
But this is considered linear operation and not constant.

Am I wrong here? Or am I missunderstaning something?

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You are thinking of add(int index, E element). –  Viruzzo Jan 17 '12 at 9:25
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6 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

It's a set operation, not an add. It just replaces the i-th entry of the array.

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ArrayList.set will replace the element at the index, not insert at the index. It's like saying:

array[i] = something;

Constant operation.

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So this could be used to add an element in the middle of the ArrayList and cause the rest of the elements to shift.

No, this interpretation is not correct. The operation replaces an existing element with a different one; it doesn't insert anything.

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set(int index, E element) Replaces the element at the specified position in this list with the specified element.

It doesn't add new element in the middle it overwrites (replaces, sets to) the element

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set replaces the element at the specified position. There's no shifting of the other values. The old element is lost.

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set

public Object set(int index, Object element) Replaces the element at the specified position in this list with the specified element (optional operation).

The method replaces the element at index and doesn't shift anything, the current element at index will be returned to you and will not be in the list anymore.

Thus, O(1)

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