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I am using this code to convert a Set to a List:

Map<String, List> mainMap = new HashMap<String, List>();

for(int i=0; i<something.size(); i++){
  Set set = getSet(...); //return different result each time
  List listOfNames = new ArrayList(set);
  mainMap.put(differentKeyName,listOfNames);
}

I want to avoid creating a new list in each iteration of the loop. Is that possible?

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I know a way to convert set to list as in Q. I want to avoind creating new list each time in loop. –  Imran Tariq Jan 17 '12 at 9:46
1  
Why can't you just add the set to mainList? Why do you need to convert the Set into a List? –  DagR Jan 17 '12 at 9:46
1  
Is it your intention to create a List<List<?>> –  Hiery Nomus Jan 17 '12 at 9:48

5 Answers 5

up vote 212 down vote accepted

You can use the List.addAll() method. It accepts a Collection as an argument, and your set is a Collection.

mainList.addAll(set);

EDIT: as respond to the edit of the question.
It is easy to see that if you want to have a Map with Lists as values, in order to have k different values, you need to create k different lists.
Thus: You cannot avoid creating these lists at all, the lists will have to be created.

Possible work around:
Declare your Map as a Map<String,Set> or Map<String,Collection> instead, and just insert your set.

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1  
sorry it was mainMap not list. see question –  Imran Tariq Jan 17 '12 at 9:51
    
@imrantariq: is differentKeyName changing every iteration? Do you actually want something.size() different possible values in your maps? It is easy to see that a map with k lists as values needs to create at least k lists. –  amit Jan 17 '12 at 9:55
    
yes key will change on each iteration. –  Imran Tariq Jan 17 '12 at 9:58
    
@imrantariq: and you want a different list for each key I assume? –  amit Jan 17 '12 at 10:00
    
yes getset() will be different each time.getSet(); –  Imran Tariq Jan 17 '12 at 10:03

Use constructor to convert it:

List<?> list = new ArrayList(set);
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Also from Guava Collect library, you can use
Lists.newArrayList([your_set])
This would be very similar to the previous answer from amit, except that you do not need to declare (or instanciate) any list object.

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If you are using guava, this is handy –  vsingh Jul 16 '13 at 18:28
    
Although you are not directly calling the constructor, this method still calls the ArrayList constructor. –  glen3b May 17 at 2:42
    
If I do not declare a List, how can I use the List created? –  Koray Tugay Jun 30 at 5:52
    
@KorayTugay, well you extract Lists.newArrayList([your_set]) in a variable (local or global). E.g: List<Foo> fooList = Lists.newArrayList(setOfFoo) But your question is flawed. If you create a list it is at least implicitly declared (if not explicitly). –  chaiyachaiya Jul 1 at 7:33
    
I was confused because in the answer you say: except that you do not need to declare any list object.. –  Koray Tugay Jul 1 at 8:10

I would do :

Map<String, Collection> mainMap = new HashMap<String, Collection>();

for(int i=0; i<something.size(); i++){
  Set set = getSet(...); //return different result each time
  mainMap.put(differentKeyName,set);
}
share|improve this answer
Map<String, List> mainMap = new HashMap<String, List>();

for(int i=0; i<something.size(); i++){
  Set set = getSet(...); //return different result each time
  mainMap.put(differentKeyName, new ArrayList(set));
}
share|improve this answer
3  
You haven't avoided creating the list. This code is trivially similar to the sample in your question. –  Taylor Sep 10 '12 at 15:04
    
But this reduces one line of code. –  Imran Tariq Nov 13 '12 at 5:14

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