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If I have created the following Employee object (simplified)...

 public class Employee
    {
        public Employee()
        {       
        }

        public String StaffID { get; set; }
        public String Forename { get; set; }
        public String Surname { get; set; }
    }

... would it be acceptable to have another property in the Employee object with a Type also being Employee to hold their Manager's details (as shown below)?

 public class Employee
    {
        public Employee()
        {       
        }

        public String StaffID { get; set; }
        public String Forename { get; set; }
        public String Surname { get; set; }

        public Employee Manager { get; set; }
    }

Also, what is the best way to instantiate the Employee object for the Manager property? Obviously including this.Manager = new Employee(); in the constructor will cause an infinite loop. Would a Manager class that inherrits from Employee be the best way (even though all the properties would be identical)?

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3  
@FelixK. Thats a bit harsh, its a good question and taken some interest read this ..in the constructor will cause an infinite loop. Remember all are not experts –  V4Vendetta Jan 17 '12 at 10:18
    
@V4Vendetta That's true, we are not all experts. But when i have a problem or question i gonna test some ways to solve the task which causes the problem. –  Felix K. Jan 17 '12 at 10:33
    
@FelixK. Yes, I did try it and it compiled fine - This is why my question was whether it was 'acceptable' rather than 'will it work' - I wanted to check whether this was good practice or not more than anything. As it happens, the solutions below regarding the instantiation of the object are pretty much what I had concluded too but again, being relatively inexperienced, I wanted to make sure that I was on track. –  triplestones Jan 17 '12 at 11:01

8 Answers 8

up vote 14 down vote accepted

An object can indeed have a reference to an object of its own type.

This is how most Node type objects are implemented.

As for instantiation - you can pass in the Employee object to use as manager (passing in null for no manager). Constructors can have multiple overloads:

public Employee(Employee manager)
{
   this.Manager = manager;
}
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1  
+1, good comparison with Node types. –  ken2k Jan 17 '12 at 10:06
    
... but obviously you shouldn't unconditionally initialize the property/field in your constructor (since that would cause either a StackOverflowException or an OutOfMemoryException, depending on the size of the object, the allocated stack size and your overall available memory). –  Nuffin Jan 17 '12 at 10:09
1  
@Tobias The code above is not going to cause any exception. It would cause one if you initialize it with this.Manager = new Employee(). –  Felix K. Jan 17 '12 at 10:12
    
The comment was meant to be directly appended to the answer (hence the ...), and I posted it before the .ctor code block was added. –  Nuffin Jan 17 '12 at 10:16
2  
@Dr.AndrewBurnett-Thompson - You seem to be missing the point of the wiki like attributes of SO. As it stands, I was adding this anyways, without looking at other answers - thanks for the assumption though. And edits are supposed to make answers better - suppose I did lift it off another answer, how does that make it bad? You downvote an answer because it was made better? –  Oded Jan 17 '12 at 10:22

Yes, an object can contain references to other objects of the same class.

And secondly, I wouldn't create a new Employee in the cunstructor but inject it like this:

public class Employee
{
    public Employee(Employee manager)
    {
        this.Manager = manager;
    }

    public String StaffID { get; set; }
    public String Forename { get; set; }
    public String Surname { get; set; }

    public Employee Manager { get; set; }
}
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+1 for constructor injection! –  Dr. ABT Jan 17 '12 at 10:08

The only scenario where this isn't possible is with a struct; a struct is contained directly (rather than being a fixed-size reference to the data), so the size of an Employee struct would have to be "the size of the other fields plus the size of an Employee", which is circular.

In particular you can't have:

struct Foo {
    Foo foo;
}

(or anything else that would result in a circular size) - the compiler responds with:

Struct member 'Foo.foo' of type 'Foo' causes a cycle in the struct layout

However, in all other cases it is fine; with the issue of initialisation, I'd say: just leave it unassigned initially, and let the caller assign a value via the property.

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Yes, you can have Employee inside Employee and it will not cause infinite loop, by default Manager property of Employee object will be null.

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It works, you can just try s.th. like:

public class A
{
    public A test { get; set; }
}
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Specifically on the issue of construction (I've +1'd Odeds answer) - as you say constructing an instance in the constructor is a bad move.

But then ask yourself - why would you ever need to anyway. In your Manager/Employee case - you can't always be sure that an employee always has a manager, and if they don't then you shouldn't be using a newed empty instance to signify that, but a null.

When your type will have public get/set accessors on the properties, generally you're likely to be loading these object trees from some external source, in which case you have nothing to worry about. Equally, you can have a constructor that accepts other Employee instances for Manager/Employee relationships etc.

You should also be checking for circular relationships in that constructor as well - i.e. an employee can't be someone's manager and their employee - try walking the child->parent relationship for that and see if it ever ends!

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First, the answer is Yes an object can have a field that contains an instance of itself. It can even have methods that accept or return the instances of the same class, and it can even depend on itself in the definition of the class, e.g:

public class Person : IComparable<Person> //legal, recursive definition
{
   //fields (or properties) that are of type Person
   public Person Father;
   public Person Mother;
   public List<Person> Children;

   // method that takes a Person as a parameter
   public bool IsParent(Person potentialParent)
   {
      ....
   }

   //method that returs a Person
   public Person Clone()
   {
      //TODO: real implementation coming soon
   }

   public Person(){}

   //constructor that takes persons as arguments
   public Person(Person father, Person Mother)
   {
      Father = father;
      Mother = mother;
   }
}

By default all reference values are null'd so you won't have a constructor problem unless you create one yourself. So, Yes, there can be some issues with circular references and endless loops (each parent has children that have children that have parents etc...) but usually they can be trivially detected and avoided.

The only times I've encountered these kind of problems is when I used XML (or other text-based) serialization on circularly referenced objects.

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I tried this way and it worked for me:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        A a = new A(new A());
    }
}

public class A
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public A a;

    public A() { }
    public A(A _a)
    {
        a = _a;
    }
}

Now you can use it in the Main() function like:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        A a = new A(new A());
        a.Name = "Roger";
        a.a.Name = "John";
        Console.WriteLine("{0}, {1}", a.Name, a.a.Name);
    }
}
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