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Here's my code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

#define M 5
#define N 3

double **create_matrix(int m, int n);
void    destroy_matrix(double **matrix, int m);

int main(void)
{
  int i = 0, j = 0;
  int x = 0;
  double **matrix;

  matrix = create_matrix(M, N);

  while (i < M) {
    j = 0;
    while (j < N) {
      printf("%4.0f", *(*(matrix + j) + i) = j);
      j++;
    }
    putchar('\n');
    i++;
  }

  destroy_matrix(matrix, M);

  return 0;
}

double **create_matrix(int m, int n)
{
  int i = 0;
  double **matrix;

  if ((matrix = (double **) malloc(sizeof(double *) * m)) != NULL) {
    while (i < m)
      if ((*(matrix + i++) = (double *) malloc(sizeof(double) * n)) == NULL)
        return NULL;

    return matrix;
  } else
    return NULL;
}

void destroy_matrix(double **matrix, int m)
{
  int i = 0;

  while (i < m)
    free((void *) *(matrix + i++));

  free((void *) matrix);
}
  • Allocating, initializing and printing the matrix works.
  • Allocating, not initializing and freeing works.
  • Allocating, initializing AND freeing does NOT work.

Backtrace:

*** glibc detected *** [file]: free(): invalid next size (fast): 0x0000000001e7d040 ***

Followed by a memory map.

I searched for similar problems but couldn't find one fitting my situation, nor could I derive mine from them.

share|improve this question
    
By the way, stackoverflow.com/questions/1733881/… is exactly the same problem, although considering you tested and thought freeing was working, I can understand the confusion. At the very least, that link has some code that you may find helpful –  sirlark Jan 17 '12 at 11:44
    
Not exactly though ... without the initialization, which, as it turned out, was the problem. –  enlightened Jan 17 '12 at 11:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your matrix allocation and deallocation functions look fine to me. But the initialization of the matrix elements has an error:

  while (i < M) {
    j = 0;
    while (j < N) {
      printf("%4.0f", *(*(matrix + j) + i) = j);
      j++;
    }
    putchar('\n');
    i++;
  }

This expression

*(*(matrix + j) + i)

has to be changed by this expression

*(*(matrix + i) + j)

because i are your rows and j are your columns.

Note that you could also use the simpler form matrix[i][j] which is equivalent to *(*(matrix + i) + j) in your program.

share|improve this answer
    
Stupid me! I inter-changed the loop variables and messed up ... ;( Thank you! –  enlightened Jan 17 '12 at 11:46
    
@enlightened you're welcome. This is a very common error when dealing with matrices. –  ouah Jan 17 '12 at 11:49

You are freeing the dereference, i.e. the address pointed to by the contents of the array. Try this instead. Note the lack of '*' before '(matrix + i++) on line 6

void destroy_matrix(double **matrix, int m)
{
  int i = 0;

  while (i < m)
    free((void *) (matrix + i++));

  free((void *) matrix);
}
share|improve this answer
    
But if matrix is a pointer to an array of pointers, then surely there must be at least one dereference for each row? –  unwind Jan 17 '12 at 11:37
    
pointer are integers, your + i++ is the same as saying matrix[i] which is a dereference already –  sirlark Jan 17 '12 at 11:38
    
come to think of it, I can't remember whether the type size is taken into account doing pointer arithmetic this way... you might even need to explicitly multiply i by sizeof(double*) –  sirlark Jan 17 '12 at 11:39
    
Dereferencing once is needed, I think. Without, it gives me: free(): invalid pointer. I'm going to try explicit multiplication now ... –  enlightened Jan 17 '12 at 11:43
    
pointers are not integers. –  ouah Jan 17 '12 at 11:45

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