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I am converting my app to use NDB. I used to have something like this before:

@db.ComputedProperty
    def someComputedProperty(self, indexed=False):
      if not self.someCondition:
          return []
      src = self.someReferenceProperty
      list =  src.list1 + src.list2 + src.list3 + src.list4 \
              + [src.str1, src.str2]
      return map(lambda x:'' if not x else x.lower(), list) 

As you can see, my method of generating the list is a bit complicated, I prefer to keep it this way. But when I started converting to NDB, I just replaced @db.ComputedProperty by @model.ComputedProperty but then I got this error:

NotImplementedError: Property someComputedProperty does not support <type 'list'> types.

I could see in model.py in ext.ndb that ComputedProperty inherits from GenericProperty where in the _db_set_value there are several if/else statements that handle value according to its type, except that there's no handling for lists

Currently it goes through the first condition and gives out that error when I return an empty list.

Is there a way to work around this and avoid the error?

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1  
Supplying indexed=False to your function in the first snippet has no effect on the indexing of your computed property. As Mohamed Khamis points out, if you don't want it indexed, though, there's no point storing it in the datastore in the first place - just use a regular @Property. –  Nick Johnson Jan 18 '12 at 2:03

2 Answers 2

You need to set the repeated=True flag for your computed property in NDB. I don't think you can use the cute "@db.ComputedProperty" notation, you'll have to say:

def _computeValue(self):
    ...same as before...
someComputedProperty = ComputedProperty(_computeValue, repeated=True, indexed=False)
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

This whole functionality can be done within a function, so it doesn't need to be a ComputedProperty. Use Computed Properties only when you want to do a computation that you might query for. A ComputedProperty can have its indexed flag set to False but then this means you won't be querying for it, and therefore don't really need to have it as a property.

def someComputedProperty(self):
  if not self.someCondition:
      return []
  src = self.someReferenceProperty
  list =  src.list1 + src.list2 + src.list3 + src.list4 \
          + [src.str1, src.str2]
  return map(lambda x:'' if not x else x.lower(), list) 
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