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I have a problem getting the currencySymbol of my NSNumberFormatter.
I use a NSNumberFormatter with a currency code "EUR".
When I format prices, the symbol is correct, I get the € symbol.
However, when I want to get just the currencySymbol with the method [formatter currencySymbol], the symbol $ is returned.
If I manually set the currencySymbol (with "A" for instance) everything will work fine and the method [formatter currencySymbol] will return the "A" symbol.


Here is my code

// Create formatter
NSNumberFormatter *formatter = [[NSNumberFormatter alloc] init];
[formatter setNumberStyle:NSNumberFormatterCurrencyStyle];
[formatter setCurrencyCode:@"EUR"];
[formatter setLocale:[NSLocale currentLocale]];

// Log the currency symbol
NSLog(@"[formatter currencyCode] : %@", [formatter currencyCode]);
NSLog(@"[formatter currencySymbol] : %@", [formatter currencySymbol]);
NSLog(@"[formatter currencySymbol] : %@", [formatter stringFromNumber:[NSNumber numberWithInt:0]]);
[formatter setCurrencySymbol:@"A"];
NSLog(@"[formatter currencySymbol] : %@", [formatter currencySymbol]);
NSLog(@"[formatter currencySymbol] : %@", [formatter stringFromNumber:[NSNumber numberWithInt:0]]);

Here are the console results :

2012-01-17 12:29:11.108[4545:207] [formatter currencySymbol] : $
2012-01-17 12:29:11.109[4545:207] [formatter currencySymbol] : €0.00
2012-01-17 12:29:11.110[4545:207] [formatter currencySymbol] : A
2012-01-17 12:29:11.111[4545:207] [formatter currencySymbol] : A0.00

I cannot force the currencySymbol since it can change.
Is there a way to get the right currencySymbol corresponding to a given currencyCode ?

Thanks

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I think you're missing the first NSLog from the console results. –  user577537 Jun 7 '12 at 15:32
    
Same issue here! currencySymbol just isn't returning what it's supposed to - as far as we can tell from the docs what it thinks it's supposed to do......... –  ATV May 5 at 5:51
    
Downvote because did not bother to check answers and mark one as right. –  Andy Jun 5 at 16:13

3 Answers 3

The issue might be that [formatter setLocale:[NSLocale currentLocale]]; overwrites some of the configuration you did prior to it. You may want to try movig that line to the top (just after the alloc/init line).

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1  
Unfortunately I still have the $ instead of the € –  nicolas Jan 17 '12 at 13:37
    
Have you tried [formatter internationalCurrencySymbol]? –  Clafou Jan 17 '12 at 13:48
1  
Yes, I forgot to mention it. It gives me "USD". –  nicolas Jan 17 '12 at 14:20
    
I wonder if there's a relationship between internationalCurrencySymbol and currencySymbol. The Apple doc leaves a lot to the imagination. I wonder if you can finally get € in currencySymbol after you do [formatter setInternationalCurrencySymbol:@"EUR"];? –  Clafou Jan 17 '12 at 14:25
1  
internationalCurrencySymbol gives you the ISO symbol for the selected locale like EUR, currencySymbol gives you the actual symbol like € –  MacTeo Nov 29 '12 at 11:50

i have used the following code/methods to get the currency from a float value

 +(NSString *) formatCurrencyTypeFloat: (float )val {

 NSNumberFormatter *formatter = [[[NSNumberFormatter alloc] init] autorelease];
    [formatter setNumberStyle:NSNumberFormatterCurrencyStyle];
    NSLocale *locale = [[NSLocale alloc] initWithLocaleIdentifier:@"us_ES"];
    or
    NSLocale *locale = [NSLocale currentLocale];;
    [formatter setLocale:locale]; 
    NSLog(@"%@",[formatter stringFromNumber:[NSNumber numberWithFloat:val]]);
    return [formatter stringFromNumber:[NSNumber numberWithFloat:val]];

}



+(NSString *) formateCurrencyTypeFloat:(float)val withSign:(NSString *)currencySign{
    NSNumberFormatter * fmt;
    NSNumber          * n;

    fmt = [[ [ NSNumberFormatter alloc ] init ]autorelease];
    n   = [ NSNumber numberWithFloat: val];

    [ fmt setFormatterBehavior: NSNumberFormatterBehavior10_4 ];
    [ fmt setCurrencySymbol: currencySign ]; //==> currencySign can be = @"$";
    [ fmt setNumberStyle: NSNumberFormatterCurrencyStyle ];


    return [ fmt stringFromNumber:n];
}

+(NSString *) formateCurrencyTypeFloat:(float)val withCode:(NSString *)currencyCode{
        NSNumberFormatter * fmt;
        NSNumber          * n;

        fmt = [[ [ NSNumberFormatter alloc ] init ]autorelease];
        n   = [ NSNumber numberWithFloat: val];

        [ fmt setFormatterBehavior: NSNumberFormatterBehavior10_4 ];
        [fmt setCurrencyCode:currencyCode];//====>@"USD";
        [ fmt setNumberStyle: NSNumberFormatterCurrencyStyle ];


        return [ fmt stringFromNumber:n];
    }
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1  
..and that relates to the question how? –  Jay May 4 at 7:37

To get the currency symbol you can use NSLocaleCurrencySymbol with NSLocale:

   NSLocale* locale = [NSLocale currentLocale];
   NSString* cs = [locale displayNameForKey:NSLocaleCurrencySymbol
                                 value:currencyCode];

To get the localized name ('US Dollar', 'Japanese Yen', ..) you can use NSLocaleCurrencyCode:

   NSLocale* locale = [NSLocale currentLocale];
   NSString* cc = [locale displayNameForKey:NSLocaleCurrencyCode
                              value:currencyCode];

where currencyCode is the currency code (JPY, USD, EUR, ..) you're interested in.

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This must be the right answer. –  Andy Jun 5 at 16:13

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