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Looks like I've missed something obvious but really can't figure out why I can't use/access a method which was assigned to a passed in Func<> parameter, I want to access/call it in the external calling context.

Below the simple example: (real results data type is not string but some complex type)

class Caller
{
    private Func<string> factory;

    public Caller()
    {
        this.factory = null;
        var adapter = new Adapter(this.factory);
        adapter.Adapt(...);

        // then I would share this factory via IoC
        dependencyContainer.RegisterUsingFactoryMethod<string>(this.factory);

        // !!! but here is factory still not assigned
        string results = this.factory();
    }
}

class Adapter
{
    private string results;

    public Adapter(Func<string> factory)
    {
        factory = () => this.results;
    }

    public IOut Adapt(IIn input)
    {
       this.results = someCalculatedData;
    }
}
share|improve this question
2  
tried to use out? –  Reniuz Jan 17 '12 at 11:58

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This has nothing to do with delegates, and everything to do with the fact that all arguments are passed by value by default. You'd see the same behaviour if factory were an int, or a string, or a StringBuilder.

If you want your Service constructor to modify the value of the argument, you need a ref or out parameter. However, I would personally suggest that you change it to use a method which returns a Func<string>:

public class Caller
{
    private readonly Func<string> factory;

    public Caller()
    {
        this.factory = Service.GetFunc();
    }
}

public class Service
{
    public static Func<string> GetFunc()
    {
        return () => Guid.NewGuid().ToString();
    }
}

(There are various other options here, such as a method group conversion, or a property. It's hard to know what to recommend when we don't have much context.)

Obviously you'd want to rename the method. But calling a constructor solely to modify an out parameter would be a very odd bit of code.

For more on parameter passing, see my article on the topic.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 and thanks for providing different solutions with interesting concerns, really I know that simply can expose a method but this slightly messing up an API of a service. The idea that service on a specific stage (not construction as in example) able to initialize a factory so I can use it later, really I'm not sure perhaps overall design with this approach is wrong –  sll Jan 17 '12 at 12:09
    
@sll: But why do you want to construct a Service object? You should be interested in what that actually provides. Any time you call a constructor and completely ignore the newly-created object, you should be concerned. –  Jon Skeet Jan 17 '12 at 12:15
    
Ok this is not a service but some kind of adapter, and whilst data transformation it should cache some intermediate data for future use, the isea was to register this data in the IoC container but this requires injecting IoC into the adapter and I do not like this idea, but now it looks like not much too bad than injecting ref Func –  sll Jan 17 '12 at 12:30
    
@sll: I'm afraid we still don't really have enough information to go on - we'd need to see a lot more of the big picture. But the use of a ref parameter in a constructor call where the returned object is then discarded is a really nasty code smell IMO. –  Jon Skeet Jan 17 '12 at 12:31
    
sorry, I've added more details to the original question so it reflects a real case –  sll Jan 17 '12 at 13:10

Can you try pasing the func with an out parameter to the constructor of Service?

e.g.

class Caller
{
    private Func<string> factory;

    public Caller()
    {
        this.factory = null;
        var service = new Service(out this.factory);

        // !!! but here is factory still not assigned
        string results = this.factory();
    }
}

class Service
{
    public Service(out Func<string> factory)
    {
        factory = () => Guid.NewGuid().ToString();
    }
}

This will ensure the compiler knows to initialize the reference to factory parameter in the Service constructor. Otherwise you are just passing a reference to the null Func to the constructor by value then locally assigning the function to that variable on the stack inside the ctor.

Please see this related question for clarity on ref and out parameters.

Best regards,

share|improve this answer
3  
That will work, but I don't think it's good design. Why call a constructor just to change the value of an out parameter? –  Jon Skeet Jan 17 '12 at 12:01
    
@JonSkeet agreed. Personally I would have a method with a signature such as "Func<string> Service.InitializeCallback()" or "Service.InitializeCallback(out Func<string> callback)" to explictly create the delegate. –  Dr. ABT Jan 17 '12 at 12:03

You never assign to the factory in the Callee,

Since you are not passing the factory to the service by reference the updates to the variable will not be seen by the caller.

I am uncertain whether or not you can pass parameters to a contructor by reference or not...

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 since you are right that adding ref modifier would solve the issue –  sll Jan 17 '12 at 12:03
    
(Just to explain my edit and deleted comment - I'd misread the answer as saying that it was passing by reference.) –  Jon Skeet Jan 17 '12 at 12:03

To call a Func<T...> reference, you just need to call as though it were a normal method. i.e.:

class Service
{
    public Service(Func<string> factory)
    {
        string result = factory();
    }
}

Note that Func<string> will return a string type.

EDIT

From your comment I have realised what you were actually asking in the OP. To be able to assign a value to any parameter, you need to mark it with out or ref. So your declaration would look like:

public Service(out Func<string> factory)

or

public Service(ref Func<string> factory)
share|improve this answer
    
Ok but I want call a factory in the Caller, so service just provide some factory to the caller. I can expose a method and use it but this is an other approach I do not want to stick with –  sll Jan 17 '12 at 11:55
    
@sll Edited my answer. –  Samuel Slade Jan 17 '12 at 12:01

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