Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have localised my app by adding the correct resource files for various European languages / dialects.

I have the required folder in my project: ./res/com/demo/localization

It contains the required files e.g. Demo.rrh, Demo.rrc, Demo_de.rrc etc.

I want to add support for 2 Chinese dialects, and I have the translations in an Excel file. On iPhone, they are referred to by the codes zh_TW & zh_CM. Following the pattern with German, I created 2 extra files called Demo_zh_TW.rrc & Demo_zh_CN.rrc.

I opened file Demo_zh_CN.rrc using Eclipse's text editor, and pasted in line of the Chinese translation using the normal resource file format:

  • START_LOCATION#0="开始位置";

When I tried to save the file, I got Eclipse's error about the Cp1252 character encoding:

Save could not be completed.

Reason: Some characters cannot be mapped using "Cp1252" character encoding. Either change the encoding or remove the characters which are not supported by the "Cp1252" character encoding.

It seems the Eclipse editor will accept the Chinese characters, but the resource tool expects that these characters must be saved in the resource file as Java Unicode /u encoding.


How do I add language support for these 2 regions without manually copy n pasting in each string?

Is there maybe a tool that I can use to Java Unicode /u encode the strings from Excel so they can be saved in Code page 1252 Latin chars only?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm not aware of any readily available tools for working with BlackBerry's peculiar localization style.

Here's a snippet of Java-SE code I use to convert the UTF-8 strings I get for use with BlackBerry:

private static String unicodeEscape(String value, CharsetEncoder encoder) {
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    for(char c : value.toCharArray()) {
        if(encoder.canEncode(c)) {
            sb.append(c);
        } else {
            sb.append("\\u");
            sb.append(hex4(c));
        }
    }
    return sb.toString();
}

private static String hex4(char c) {
    String ret = Integer.toHexString(c);
    while(ret.length() < 4) {
        ret = "0" + ret;
    }
    return ret;
}

Call unicodeEscape with the 8859-1 encoder with Charset.forName("ISO-8859-1").newEncoder()

share|improve this answer

I suggest you look at Blackberry Hindi and Gujarati text display

You need to use the resource editor to make these files with the right encoding. Eclipse will escape the characters automatically.

share|improve this answer
    
I see this forces the editor to save the characters using /u encoding, but when viewed, they are displayed in Chinese characters. This is good, but a manual process of copying in all the strings is not ideal. –  Richard Le Mesurier Jan 17 '12 at 14:20

This is a problem with the encoding of your resource file. 1252 Code Page contains Latin characters only.

I have never worked with Eclipse, but there should be somewhere you specify the encoding of the file, you should set your default encoding for files to UTF-8 if possible. This will handle your chinese characters.

You could also use a good editor like Notepad++ or EMEditor to set the encoding of your file.

See here for how you can configure Eclipse to use UTF-8 by default.

share|improve this answer
    
thx, but this does not seem to be the problem. I changed the resource file to UTF-8, and I see it can save the Chinese characters. However, it seems the BlackBerry language resource tool actually does not read the Chinese. It automatically /u escapes all the characters when I manually copy them into the editor (suggestion by @Sheepdogsheep). –  Richard Le Mesurier Jan 17 '12 at 14:19
    
UTF-8 is usually the right solution, but BlackBerry tools cannot be configured to work with UTF-8 when building on Windows. Characters that can't be represented by cp1252 can be represented by using 'java unicode escape' en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Java_Programming/Syntax/… –  Michael Donohue Jan 18 '12 at 7:07

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.