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Help converting type - cannot implicitly convert type 'string' to 'bool'

I've got this code:

private double Price;
private bool Food;
private int count;
private decimal finalprice;

public void Readinput()
{
    Console.Write("Unit price:  ");
    Price = Console.ReadLine();

    Console.Write("Food item y/n:  ");
    Food = Console.ReadLine();

    Console.Write("Count:  ");
    count = Console.ReadLine();
}

private void calculateValues()
{
    finalprice = Price * count;
}

and get the following errors:

Cannot implicitly convert type 'string' to 'bool'

Cannot implicitly convert type 'string' to 'double'

Cannot implicitly convert type 'string' to 'int'

Cannot implicitly convert type 'double' to 'decimal'. An explicit conversion exists (are you missing a cast?)

I know what it means but I don't know how to fix it.

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marked as duplicate by CodeCaster, Daniel Fischer, Tim Post Jan 18 '12 at 14:25

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Hey, why the votes down? –  ivowiblo Jan 17 '12 at 13:41
    
Did you read any tutorial before posting the question ? –  Steve B Jan 17 '12 at 13:41
5  
I don't think this question deserves that many downvotes.Giving him directions would be much more helpful. –  Bastardo Jan 17 '12 at 13:42
5  
@ivowiblo: I didn't vote down, but I imagine this is because the answer to this question is so simple that downvoters think the OP didn't try himself before posting. Hard to say they are wrong. –  Steve B Jan 17 '12 at 13:42
1  
I think the idea is to help and give directions. Answering with a link to a duplicated question is enough. –  ivowiblo Jan 17 '12 at 14:23

5 Answers 5

Use bool.Parse or bool.TryParse method to convert string value to boolean.

Price = double.Parse(Console.ReadLine());
Food =bool.Parse(Console.ReadLine());
count = int.Parse(Console.ReadLine());

You can't convert "y" or "n" value to boolean instead your have to receive value as a string and if it is "y" then store true, false otherwise.

Console.Write("Food item y/n:  ");
string answer = Console.ReadLine();
if(answer=="y")
   Food=true;
else
   Food=false;

Or (suggestion of @Mr-Happy)

 Food = answer == "y"

You need to specify explicit cast while calculating finalprice.

private void calculateValues()
{
   // convert double result into decimal.
    finalprice =(decimal) Price * count;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
You probably want to use Food = answer == "y"; though –  dvdvorle Mar 1 '13 at 8:37

You have to convert what you read from the console (which is a string) to the actual type using the static class Convert. For example:

Console.Write("Count:  ");
count = Convert.ToInt32(Console.ReadLine());

This crashes if the argument given can't be converted, but this is not your primary problem right now, so let's keep it simple.

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Console.Write("Unit price:  ");
double.TryParse(Console.ReadLine(), out Price);

Console.Write("Food item y/n:  ");
bool.TryParse(Console.ReadLine(), out Food);

Console.Write("Count:  ");
int.TryParse(Console.ReadLine(), out count);
share|improve this answer
private double Price;
private bool Food;
private int count;
private decimal finalprice;

public void Readinput()
{
    Console.Write("Unit price:  ");
    double.TryParse(Console.ReadLine(), out Price);

    Console.Write("Food item y/n:  ");
    bool.TryParse(Console.ReadLine(), out Food);

    Console.Write("Count:  ");
    int.TryParse(Console.ReadLine(), out count);
}

private void calculateValues()
{
    finalprice = Price * count;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Use of tryparse is useless if you don't catch the result. How do you know something is wrong ? Either use the classic Parse with the throw of an exception, or wrap the tryparse with a if(!tryparse(..)) error handling –  Steve B Jan 17 '12 at 13:44
    
Indeed it would be better when you catch the errors but the application will nog crash and use the default value for double = 0, bool = false and int = 0. –  Wouter Janssens - Xelos bvba Jan 17 '12 at 13:47
    
So it depends on the business requirement... should the program inform the user he typed something wrong ? I think the answer is yes. The answer should be yes. My opinion is that silent errors are more dangerous (it can leads to problems later) than a application crash. –  Steve B Jan 17 '12 at 13:55

You have to wrap the Console.ReadLine() calls in the appropriate parser functions, since (unlike PHP, for example) C# is a static typed language, additionally only conversions which are guaranteed to be both safe and lossless can be done implicitly:

Price = double.Parse(Console.ReadLine());

Console.Write("Food item y/n:  ");
// I think you want the user to type in "y", "Y", "n" or "N", right?
Food = Console.ReadLine().ToUpper() == "Y";

Console.Write("Count:  ");
count = int.Parse(Console.ReadLine());

And in your calculation method, you have to explicitly convert the resulting double into a decimal since C# doesn't support implicit conversion between fixed point and floating point values:

finalprice = (decimal)(Price * count);
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