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I have been coding with C# for a good little while, but this locking sequence does not make any sense to me. My understanding of locking is that once a lock is obtained with lock(object), the code has to exit the lock scope to unlock the object.

This brings me to the question at hand. I cut out the code below which happens to appear in an animation class in my code. The way the method works is that settings are passed to the method and modified and then passed to a another overloaded method. That other overloaded method will pass all the information to another thread to handle and actually animate the object in some way. When the animation completes, the other thread calls the OnComplete method. This actually all works perfectly, but I do not understand why!

The other thread is able to call OnComplete, obtain a lock on the object and signal to the original thread that it should continue. Should the code not freeze at this point since the object is held in a lock on another thread?

So this is not a need for help in fixing my code, it is a need for clarification on why it works. Any help in understanding is appreciated!

public void tween(string type, object to, JsDictionaryObject properties) {
    // Settings class that has a delegate field OnComplete.
    Tween.Settings settings = new Tween.Settings();
    object wait_object = new object();

    settings.OnComplete = () => {
        // Why are we able to obtain a lock when the wait_object already has a lock below?
        lock(wait_object) {
            // Let the waiting thread know it is ok to continue now.
            Monitor.Pulse(wait_object);
        }
    };

    // Send settings to other thread and start the animation.
    tween(type, null, to, settings);

    // Obtain a lock to ensure that the wait object is in synchronous code.
    lock(wait_object) {
        // Wait here if the script tells us to.  Time out with total duration time + one second to ensure that we actually DO progress.
        Monitor.Wait(wait_object, settings.Duration + 1000);
    }
}
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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

As documented, Monitor.Wait releases the monitor it's called with. So by the time you try to acquire the lock in OnComplete, there won't be another thread holding the lock.

When the monitor is pulsed (or the call times out) it reacquires it before returning.

From the docs:

Releases the lock on an object and blocks the current thread until it reacquires the lock.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 But, for some reason, I find this way of signalling slightly convoluted compared to using an EventWaitHandle to synchronize. I am not sure if there is a performance difference, but I always need to stop and examine the code more thoroughly in such case. If nothing else, there are more lines of code involved. –  Groo Jan 17 '12 at 14:14
    
Not too much and not too little detail. I like it. Thanks for making it understandable! –  DanielG Jan 17 '12 at 14:28

I wrote an article about this: Wait and Pulse demystified

There's more going on than meets the eye!

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That article explains the Monitor class in great detail. Thank you. –  DanielG Jan 17 '12 at 14:29

Remember that :

lock(someObj)
{
  int uselessDemoCode = 3;
}

Is equivalent to:

Monitor.Enter(someObj);
try
{
  int uselessDemoCode = 3;
}
finally
{
  Monitor.Exit(someObj);
}

Actually there are variants of this that varies from version to version.

Already, it should be clear that we could mess with this with:

lock(someObj)
{
   Monitor.Exit(someObj);
   //Don't have the lock here!
   Monitor.Enter(someObj);
   //Have the lock again!
}

You might wonder why someone would do this, and well, so would I, it's a silly way to make code less clear and less reliable, but it does come into play when you want to use Pulse and Wait, which the version with explicit Enter and Exit calls makes clearer. Personally, I prefer to use them over lock if I'm going to Pulse or Wait for that reason; I find that lock stops making code cleaner and starts making it opaque.

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I tend to avoid this style, but, as Jon already said, Monitor.Wait releases the monitor it's called with, so there is no locking at that point.

But the example is slightly flawed IMHO. The problem is, generally, that if Monitor.Pulse gets called before Monitor.Wait, the waiting thread will never be signaled. Having that in mind, the author decided to "play safe" and used an overload which specified a timeout. So, putting aside the unnecessary acquiring and releasing of the lock, the code just doesn't feel right.

To explain this better, consider the following modification:

public static void tween()
{
    object wait_object = new object();

    Action OnComplete = () =>
    {
        lock (wait_object)
        {
            Monitor.Pulse(wait_object);
        }
    };

    // let's say that a background thread
    // finished really quickly here
    OnComplete();

    lock (wait_object)
    {
        // this will wait for a Pulse indefinitely
        Monitor.Wait(wait_object);
    }
}

If OnComplete gets called before the lock is acquired in the main thread, and there is no timeout, we will get a deadlock. In your case, Monitor.Wait will simply hang for a while and continue after a timeout, but you get the idea.

That is why I usually recommend a simpler approach:

public static void tween()
{
    using (AutoResetEvent evt = new AutoResetEvent(false))
    {
        Action OnComplete = () => evt.Set();

        // let's say that a background thread
        // finished really quickly here
        OnComplete();

        // event is properly set even in this case
        evt.WaitOne();
    }
}

To quote MSDN:

The Monitor class does not maintain state indicating that the Pulse method has been called. Thus, if you call Pulse when no threads are waiting, the next thread that calls Wait blocks as if Pulse had never been called. If two threads are using Pulse and Wait to interact, this could result in a deadlock.

Contrast this with the behavior of the AutoResetEvent class: If you signal an AutoResetEvent by calling its Set method, and there are no threads waiting, the AutoResetEvent remains in a signaled state until a thread calls WaitOne, WaitAny, or WaitAll. The AutoResetEvent releases that thread and returns to the unsignaled state.

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So the AutoResetEvent will signal even if it is called before the lock WaitOne is called. That might be handy in certain circumstances. The only problem is that it does not have a timeout property. That timeout in the Monitor.Wait is indispensable in this instance. –  DanielG Jan 17 '12 at 14:43
    
It does have a timeout overload. And that's why it's the preferred way of synchronization. The funniest thing is that the MSDN example for Monitor.Pulse is flawed the same way as your example. :) –  Groo Jan 17 '12 at 14:48
    
Well, if that is the case, then I might want to switch over to it for clarity. It looks like it might be a better, easier and safer class to use. Thanks! –  DanielG Jan 17 '12 at 14:59

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