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I just observed this behavior;

Pattern p1 = Pattern.compile("^$");
Matcher m1 = p1.matcher("");
System.out.println(m1.matches()); /* true */

Pattern p2 = Pattern.compile("^$", Pattern.MULTILINE);
Matcher m2 = p2.matcher("");
System.out.println(m2.matches()); /* false */

It strikes me as odd that the last statement is false. This is what the docs say;

By default, the regular expressions ^ and $ ignore line terminators and only match at the beginning and the end, respectively, of the entire input sequence. If MULTILINE mode is activated then ^ matches at the beginning of input and after any line terminator except at the end of input. When in MULTILINE mode $ matches just before a line terminator or the end of the input sequence. http://docs.oracle.com/javase/1.4.2...

From what I get from this, it should match? The following makes things even more confusing;

Pattern p3 = Pattern.compile("^test$");
Matcher m3 = p3.matcher("test");
System.out.println(m3.matches()); /* true */

Pattern p4 = Pattern.compile("^test$", Pattern.MULTILINE);
Matcher m4 = p4.matcher("test");
System.out.println(m4.matches()); /* true */

So what is this? How do I make sense of this? I hope someone can shed some light on this, would be really appreciated.

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1  
This is Java SE 6 (MacOS X Default) –  wietsevenema Jan 17 '12 at 14:28
    
Just tried it on OpenJDK (IcedTea6 1.9.10) and the same strange behavior holds. –  Davy Landman Jan 17 '12 at 14:33
    
Same on Oracle JRE 7 –  Ingo Jan 18 '12 at 11:25

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If MULTILINE mode is activated then ^ matches at the beginning of input and after any line terminator except at the end of input.

Since you are at the end of input, ^ can't match in multiline mode.

This is surprising, even disgusting, but nevertheless according to its documentation.

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This "except at the end of the input" refers only to "and after any line terminator". Since we have no line terminator we are at the beginning of the input, so it should match. –  stema Jan 17 '12 at 15:13
    
/^$/m, /^$/, /\A\Z/m, /\A\Z/, \A\z/, /^/m, /$/m match the empty string in Perl. Is this a platform issue? All docs say the same thing. Strange! –  sln Jan 17 '12 at 15:40
    
@stema How do you know this? I mean, the behaviour looks like it references to whether ^ may match at all. –  Ingo Jan 17 '12 at 18:51
    
It works also this way in oracle JDK 7 –  Ingo Jan 18 '12 at 11:25

Let's look a bit closer at your second example:

Pattern p2 = Pattern.compile("^$", Pattern.MULTILINE);
Matcher m2 = p2.matcher("");
System.out.println(m2.matches()); /* false */

So you have a line in m2, that is empty OR contains only character of endline and no other characters. Therefore you pattern, in order to correspond to the given line, should be only "$" i.e.:

// Your example
Pattern p2 = Pattern.compile("^$", Pattern.MULTILINE);
Matcher m2 = p2.matcher("");
System.out.println(m2.matches()); /* false */

// Let's check if it is start of the line
p2 = Pattern.compile("^", Pattern.MULTILINE);
m2 = p2.matcher("");
System.out.println(m2.matches()); /* false */

// Let's check if it is end of the line
p2 = Pattern.compile("$", Pattern.MULTILINE);
m2 = p2.matcher("");
System.out.println(m2.matches()); /* true */
share|improve this answer
    
It doesn't address the OP's question that "^$" matches without MULTILINE mode but fails to do so in MULTILINE mode. –  anubhava Jan 17 '12 at 14:57
    
@anubhava It is, cause we don't have the beginning of the sequence, but only end of it. According to JDK API: In multiline mode the expressions ^ and $ match just after or just before, respectively, a line terminator or the end of the input sequence. By default these expressions only match at the beginning and the end of the entire input sequence. (docs.oracle.com/javase/1.4.2/docs/api/java/util/regex/…) In single line, we are getting an empty string, and in multiline mode - empty sequence. –  wanderlust Jan 17 '12 at 15:05
    
+1 for being first. Makes sense to me. –  Jason McCreary Jan 17 '12 at 15:17
    
"^$" in multiline mode matches the empty string in Perl, so is that a bug in Perl then? –  sln Jan 17 '12 at 15:30

Sounds like a bug. At most, in multi-line mode, "^" and "$" could be interpreted as matching at an internal line boundary. Java might not have extended variable state structure say, like Perl does. I don't know if this is even a cause.

The fact that /^test$/m matches just prove ^$ work in multi-line mode except when the string is empty (in Java), but clearly multi-line mode test for empty string is ludicrous since /^$/ work for that.

Testing in Perl, everything works as expected:

if ( "" =~ /^$/m   ) { print "/^\$/m    matches\n"; }
if ( "" =~ /^$/    ) { print "/^\$/     matches\n"; }
if ( "" =~ /\A\Z/m ) { print "/\\A\\Z/m  matches\n"; }
if ( "" =~ /\A\Z/  ) { print "/\\A\\Z/   matches\n"; }
if ( "" =~ /\A\z/  ) { print "/\\A\\z/   matches\n"; }
if ( "" =~ /^/m    ) { print "/^/m     matches\n"; }
if ( "" =~ /$/m    ) { print "/\$/m     matches\n"; }


__END__


/^$/m    matches
/^$/     matches
/\A\Z/m  matches
/\A\Z/   matches
/\A\z/   matches
/^/m     matches
/$/m     matches
share|improve this answer
    
Agreed, I tested /^$/m and /^$/ for .net, its also working as expected. –  stema Jan 17 '12 at 15:33

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