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Let's say we have this kind of loop (pseudocode)

double d = 0.0
for i in 1..10 {
    d = d + 0.1
    print(d)
}

In C with printf("%f", d) I get this:

0.100000
0.200000
0.300000
...
1.000000

In C++ with cout << d I get this:

0.1
0.2
...
1

In Java with System.out.println(d) I get this:

0.1
0.2
0.3 (in debug mode, I see 0.30000000000004 there but it prints 0.3)
...
0.7
0.799999999999999
0.899999999999999
0.999999999999999

So my questions are these:

  1. Why is this simple code printed in Java so badly and is correct in C?
  2. How does this behave in other languages?
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1  
    
These are not decimal numbers, they are binary. Learn this well. –  Dietrich Epp Jan 17 '12 at 14:36
    
StackOverflow needs a bayesian filter which automatically looks for the words 'Decimal' and 'Precision' in new posts... –  mcfinnigan Jan 17 '12 at 14:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Why is this simple code printed in Java so badly and is correct in C?

Since you are not comparing the same operations, you will get different result.

The behaviour of double is exactly the same across different languages as it uses the hardware to perform these operations in each case. The only difference is the methods you have chosen to display the result.

In Java, if you run

double d = 0;
for (int i = 1; i <= 10; i++)
    System.out.printf("%f%n", d += 0.1);

it prints

0.100000
0.200000
0.300000
0.400000
0.500000
0.600000
0.700000
0.800000
0.900000
1.000000

If you run

double d = 0;
for (int i = 0; i < 8; i++) d += 0.1;
System.out.println("Summing 0.1, 8 times " + new BigDecimal(d));
System.out.println("How 0.8 is represented " + new BigDecimal(0.8));

you get

Summing 0.1, 8 times 0.79999999999999993338661852249060757458209991455078125
How 0.8 is represented 0.8000000000000000444089209850062616169452667236328125
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1  
Does it mean that in every language the double value 0.8 is stored as 0.79999999999999? Because this ugly value I can see in debug mode in the variable view. –  Tomas Jan 17 '12 at 14:31
    
@Tomas: the way you compute .8 yield .79999999999999993339, but if you just enter the literal, you'll get .80000000000000004441. –  larsmans Jan 17 '12 at 14:33
    
No, the value of 0.8 is not exact, but the sum or 0.1 + 0.1 + ... 0.1 is slightly less than the representation for 0.8. See my edit. –  Peter Lawrey Jan 17 '12 at 14:35
1  
If you construct a BigDecimal using the new BigDecimal(double) constructor, it will have the exactly same value as the passed double, that means that new BigDecimal(0.1) will have the "wrong" value. Use the new BigDecimal(String) constructor instead, it's value will be precise, i.e. the value of new BigDecimal("0.1") will be precisely 0.1. –  Natix Jan 17 '12 at 14:53
1  
@Peter Lawrey I agree, I was just pointing this out for Tomas. –  Natix Jan 17 '12 at 16:59
  1. Because of the way the print routines behave. 0.1 cannot be exactly represented in a binary floating point format.
  2. In Python:

    >>> print('%.20f' % (.1 * 8))
    0.80000000000000004441
    >>> d = .0
    >>> for i in xrange(10):
    ...  d += .1
    ...  print('%.20f' % d)
    ... 
    0.10000000000000000555
    0.20000000000000001110
    0.30000000000000004441
    0.40000000000000002220
    0.50000000000000000000
    0.59999999999999997780
    0.69999999999999995559
    0.79999999999999993339
    0.89999999999999991118
    0.99999999999999988898
    

    But note:

    >>> print('%.20f' % .8)
    0.80000000000000004441
    
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Re my [now deleted] answer, yes you're correct. –  Joe Jan 17 '12 at 14:32

As answered here, this is not related to any language.

See here: What Every Programmer Should Know About Floating-Point Arithmetic

Real numbers are infinite. Computers are working with a finite number of bits (32 bits, 64 bits today). As a result floating-point arithmetic done by computers cannot represent all the real numbers. 0.1 is one of these numbers.

Note that is not an issue related to Ruby, but to all programming languages because it comes from the way computers represent real numbers.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for link to Goldberg paper. –  Robᵩ Jan 17 '12 at 15:16

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