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Please help me understand the meaning of this code. I have seen this kind of usage for the first time

typedef enum {

        E_1_DEFAULT = 0,
        E_1_1,
        E_1_2,
        E_1_3,
        E_1_4,
        E_1_5,
        E_1_255 = 255           //needs at least 8Bit

} APPLICATION_ENUM_1;                           

typedef enum {

        E_2_DEFAULT = 0,
        E_2_1,
        E_2_2,
        E_2_3                   //needs at least 2Bit

} APPLICATION_ENUM_2;                           

typedef enum {

        E_3_DEFAULT = 0,
        E_3_1,
        E_3_2,
        E_3_3,
        E_3_4,
        E_3_5,
        E_3_666 = 666           //needs at least 10Bit

} APPLICATION_ENUM_3;



typedef struct {

        APPLICATION_ENUM_3      var3:10;                // 10Bit
        APPLICATION_ENUM_1      var1:8;         // 18Bit
        APPLICATION_ENUM_2      var2:2;         // 20Bit
        uint8                   unnused_1:4;   // fill up the last whole byte -> 24Bit = 3byte

} APPLICATION_RAM;;
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1  
You might want to get yourself a decent introductory book on C, C++ or whatever related language this is, and start at chapter one. –  Paul R Jan 17 '12 at 15:17
    
@Jesper: what makes you think this is necessarily C++ ? It looks more like C, but it could equally well be something else, e.g. Objective-C. –  Paul R Jan 17 '12 at 15:18
1  
@PaulR I am yet to find a C / C++ book that covers bitfields in chapter 1 if at all –  parapura rajkumar Jan 17 '12 at 15:20
2  
@Jesper I'd argue that the use of typedef of an anonymous struct marks it as C, not C++. @bubble -- can you tag this with whatever language you are asking about? –  Robᵩ Jan 17 '12 at 15:21
    
@parapura: perhaps, but if enums are unfamiliar then that suggests that it's time to read a good introductory book before going much further. –  Paul R Jan 17 '12 at 15:22

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

According to the C++ standard

The underlying type of an enumeration is an integral type that can represent all the enumerator values defined in the enumeration.

Now lets look at the first definition

typedef enum {

        E_1_DEFAULT = 0,
        E_1_1,
        E_1_2,
        E_1_3,
        E_1_4,
        E_1_5,
        E_1_255 = 255           //needs at least 8Bit

} APPLICATION_ENUM_1; 

definition E_1_255 = 255 ensures that all values from 0 to 255 can be represented by this enum type and you need at least 8bits to represent all values from 0 to 255

typedef struct {

        APPLICATION_ENUM_3      var3:10;                // 10Bit
        APPLICATION_ENUM_1      var1:8;         // 18Bit
        APPLICATION_ENUM_2      var2:2;         // 20Bit
        uint8                   unnused_1:4;   // 24Bit = 3byte

} APPLICATION_RAM;

The above struct is using a seldom used bitfield construct. Basically declaring the APPLICATION_RAM as a struct that has a

  • var3 member that is 10 bits
  • var1 member that is 8 bits
  • var2 member that is 2 bits
  • unnused_1 member that is 4 bits
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thanks for taking time to answer. –  bubble Jan 26 '12 at 5:04

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