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How can I style the first (top level) li and the last (top level) li with CSS or jQuery?

I am using CSS to set the first li style but it is also styling the first li in each secondary level ul, so how can I get it to style only the li with Main 1 in it and the last one with Main 6 in it?

Here is my code:

<style>
ul li:first-child
{
width: 800px;
border:1px solid #fc5604; border-top-width:thin; (2px)
}
</style>

and HTML:

<div id="nav">
    <ul>
        <li><a href="#">Main 1</a>
            <ul>
                <li><a href="#">Sub 1a</a></li>
                <li><a href="#">Sub 1b</a></li>
                <li><a href="#">Sub 1c</a></li>
            </ul>
        </li>
        <li><a href="#">Main 2</a>
            <ul>
                <li><a href="#">Sub 2</a></li>
            </ul>
        </li>
        <li><a href="#">Main 3</a>
            <ul>
                <li><a href="#">Sub 3</a></li>
            </ul>
        </li>
        <li><a href="#">Main 4</a>
            <ul>
                <li><a href="#">Sub 4</a></li>
            </ul>
        </li>
        <li><a href="#">Main 5</a></li>
        <li><a href="#">Main 6</a>
            <ul>
                <li><a href="#">Sub 6</a></li>
            </ul>
        </li>
    </ul>   
</div>
share|improve this question
    
For maximum cross browser compatibility you should add a class to the first and last list item and style them based on class. –  Justin Helgerson Jan 17 '12 at 15:12
    
@user520300 Did you find a solution to your problem? –  Nix Feb 10 '12 at 17:13

5 Answers 5

The first item is quite simple, and I see you already have the :first-child down. :last-child does the same, but it has limited support in IE. However, if the number of list items are fixed (which it seems to me), you can actually target the last item with CSS alone. Observe!

li + li + li +li + li + li { background:pink; }

Here's a Fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/jgRZQ/1/

The + selector basically targets the immediate next sibling (if it matches your type), so it's a matter of counting your way to the last. And yes, this works in IE7. :)

share|improve this answer

You have to use the immediate child selector:

ul > li:first-child

This rule will affect an <li> that is only immediately preceded by a <ul>. This should apply to both jQuery and css. Not all browsers can use the pseudo classes (especially last-child.

share|improve this answer
2  
It's called the child selector, not the "direct parent selector". –  T.J. Crowder Jan 17 '12 at 15:10
<style>
    ul > li:first-child, ul > li:last-child
    {
        width: 800px;
        border:1px solid #fc5604; border-top-width:thin; (2px)
    }
</style>
share|improve this answer
    
Bear in mind that the :last-child selector isn't supported by Internet Explorer 8 and below. –  James Allardice Jan 17 '12 at 15:12

If you'd like to use jQuery you could use the following:

$('#nav > ul li').first().css('background-color', 'red');
$('#nav > ul li').last().css('background-color', 'red');

^ should do the trick.

share|improve this answer
    
the last didnt work because probably the last li is actually the nested one but i need it to be the parent li –  user520300 Jan 17 '12 at 15:54

Give a class name for first ul tag.

<div id="nav">
    <ul class="list">
        <li><a href="#">Main 1</a>
            <ul>
                <li><a href="#">Sub 1a</a></li>
                <li><a href="#">Sub 1b</a></li>
                <li><a href="#">Sub 1c</a></li>
            </ul>...........
...................................

Then you can use like the following CSS:

<style>
ul.list > li:first-child{
width: 800px;
border:1px solid #fc5604; border-top-width:thin; (2px)
}
ul.list > li:last-child{
width: 800px;
border:1px solid #fc5604; border-top-width:thin; (2px)
}
</style>
share|improve this answer

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