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What is The Rule of Three?

How exactly does std::pair call destructors for its components? I am trying to add instances of a class to an std::map, but I am getting errors regarding the destructor of my class.

I have narrowed down my question/problem to the following extremely simple example.

Below, my_class merely creates an int array at construction, and deletes it at destruction. Somehow I am getting a "double delete" error:

//my_class.h
class my_class {
  public:
    int an_int;
    int *array;

    //constructors:
    my_class()
    {
      array = new int[2];
    }
    my_class(int new_int) : an_int(new_int)
    {
      array = new int[2];
    }

    //destructor:
    ~my_class()
    {
      delete[] array;
    }
};  //end of my_class

Meanwhile, over in main.cpp...

//main.cpp
int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
  std::map<int, my_class>   my_map;

  my_map.insert( std::make_pair<int, my_class> (1, my_class(71) ) );

  return 0;
} // end main

Compilation goes fine, but this generates the following runtime error:

*** glibc detected *** ./experimental_code: double free or corruption (fasttop):

Or, with valgrind:

==15258== Invalid free() / delete / delete[] / realloc()
==15258==    at 0x40249D7: operator delete[](void*) (vg_replace_malloc.c:490)
==15258==    by 0x8048B99: main (my_class.h:38)
==15258==  Address 0x42d6028 is 0 bytes inside a block of size 8 free'd
==15258==    at 0x40249D7: operator delete[](void*) (vg_replace_malloc.c:490)
==15258==    by 0x8048B91: main (my_class.h:38)

(line numbers are off because I cut out comments and stuff)

I must be missing something about std::pair...?

Thanks to all in advance!

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marked as duplicate by Xeo, Stephen Canon, sbi, R. Martinho Fernandes, Graviton Jan 18 '12 at 3:02

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Why don't you use int array[2] instead of int *array? –  Pubby Jan 17 '12 at 15:31
9  
2  
Note that you wouldn't need a copy constructor or copy assignment operator if you didn't allocate memory directly. Try std::vector<int> an_array instead. –  Robᵩ Jan 17 '12 at 15:36
    
@Xeo: In many cases, you can better use standard containers and omit your copy constructor and copy assignment. Don't blindly assume that hand written copying is the best solution. –  phresnel Jan 17 '12 at 15:42
    
@phresnel: Err, thanks, I know that. If you however someday need to go play with the bits (or implement std::vector as homework), well, it's good to know about the rule of three. –  Xeo Jan 17 '12 at 15:46
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4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

When you add my_class to stl containers the copy constructor is called. As you don't define one it does a memberwise copy and two my_class objects are created that point to the same int array, When these are deleted the same int array might be deleted twice

Please take a look at Rule of three

In C++11 also look at move constructor if you are worried about the efficiency.

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Thanks. I didn't even know copy constructors existed - that's what happens when you learn C++ only from online forums :( –  M.P. Jan 17 '12 at 17:05
1  
@CycoMatto If you are on a learning spree, also google for move constructor in C++11 –  parapura rajkumar Jan 17 '12 at 17:14
    
@CycoMatto: In the beginning, I learned C++ through online resources, too. I can tell you that this is quite dangerous in C++. A lot of bad and harmful code is there, if you do not know the right resources. Read the GotW column (link in my answer), for example. And have a look at The List. –  phresnel Jan 18 '12 at 7:10
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Your class violates the rule of three by defining a destructor without a copy constructor and an assignment operator. Once you define these, your code should run OK: STL containers rely heavily on these, so you should ask yourself if you've implemented all three every time you use a class as a template argument for an STL container.

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You have to define a suitable copy constructor because copies of your class share the same array through copied instances of the pointers.

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Rule of three is fancy. Standard containers are usually fancier.


The problem is that not the array is copied, but rather the pointers to them. Now if two instances hold the same pointers, you will be deleting the same array twice.

You could define proper copy operations for your class, but usually using standard containers solves all of your problems of copying, memory acquisition, memory freeing, self-assignment, exception guarantees.

  • Use std::vector as a drop-in replacement for dynamic arrays.
  • Use std::array as a drop-in replacement for fixed-size arrays.

If all your members have proper copy-semantics, your class does not even need explicit copying operations, so you save a lot of work and increase maintainability and reduce error chances.

So:

In general, prefer standard containers over manual arrays:

class my_class {
public:
    my_class()
    : new_int(0), array(2)
    {}

    my_class(int new_int)
    : an_int(new_int), array(2)
    {}

private:
    int an_int;
    std::vector<int> array; // do not expose them
}; 

or

class my_class {
public:
    my_class()
    : new_int(0)
    {}

    my_class(int new_int)
    : an_int(new_int)
    {}

private:
    int an_int;
    std::array<int,2> array; // do not expose them
}; 

Iff you must omit standard containers:

  • Write a copy constructor.
  • Write copy assignment. or
  • Forbid copying altogether.

Buf before doing so, read about rule of three, be aware of the dangers of self assignment, know the swap trick (note: this is a common C++ idiom), and learn about exception safety (note: you'll find a lot of the book's content in the GotW series of articles for free).

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1  
Your answer changes original class DRAMATICALLY. If you don't see it, try printing sizeof() of your class and original class. That's 28 byte difference on my machine - from original 8 to 36 with your solution. Considering that author wants to hold just 2 int's there, don't you think 28 bytes of additional overhead to accommodate 8 bytes is a BIT too much? I mean, your std::vector<int>'s size is itself TWICE bigger than original class PLUS allocated memory. –  Petr Budnik Jan 17 '12 at 16:42
    
@AzzA Excellent point. In the real program, with the real class, there will be several thousand instances of the class (and there are many member variables not shown). So I suppose this extra overhead is worth worrying about... –  M.P. Jan 17 '12 at 16:52
    
@AzzA: Firstly: Changing it dramatically was my intention: Exception safety for free, memory management for free, copying semantics for free; see, there's almost no code to manage the data, yet it's there. When time/money matters, then writing tens of thousands of lines of correct code with all the boilerplate is expensive and error prone. Manual management has its use cases. But that's in special circumstances, not in general ones. –  phresnel Jan 18 '12 at 6:53
    
@Azza: Secondly: Usually you don't allocate a fixed size array of two integers, so my assumption that CycoMatto's code was exemplary is not beside the point. Unfortunately, he/she didn't give detail on the purpose of that class, so I propose the general solution first, the special solution second. –  phresnel Jan 18 '12 at 6:56
    
@AzzA: Thirdly: The lack of knowledge about copying semantics lets me assume that CycoMatto is relatively new to C++, so proposing manual memory and copy management without mentioning stuff like self assignment, swap trick and exception safety in general is rather harmful to his career. –  phresnel Jan 18 '12 at 6:58
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