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Say I have a loop like this:

for (int i = 0; i < someint; i++)
{
    if (i == somecondition)
    {
        DoSomething();
        continue;
    }
    doSomeOtherStuff();
}

Versus...

for (int i = 0; i < someint; i++)
{
    if (i == somecondition)
    {
        DoSomething();
    }
    else
    {
        doSomeOtherStuff();
    }
}

Is there any reason to use one over the other? Or is it just personal preference?
The main language I'm asking this for is Java, but I guess it also applies to most others.

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1  
Pretty sure the compiler will optimize both and they'll have the same performance. –  talnicolas Jan 17 '12 at 15:48
1  
You'll find the answers would vary greatly for a non-trivial bit of code. It really depends on how much other code is in the loop, and exactly what it does. –  edA-qa mort-ora-y Jan 17 '12 at 16:21
1  
If the if clause is short and the else clause longer, I would use the first form. –  Peter Lawrey Jan 17 '12 at 16:26
    
This is all about readability and thus personal preference and will depend a lot on the actual code you are using it in. In the above I would prefer else {} but that will not always be the case. It depends on exactly what is in the second half, how long it is, how much I want to modify existing code etc. So do not take generic advice then start applying it universally, you need to sit and think does it make it easier to read in this situation. –  Loki Astari Jan 17 '12 at 16:30

8 Answers 8

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Technically, no, but I find the second one prettier for this particular case.

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3  
Agreed, it seems more readable IMHO. –  Paul Bellora Jan 17 '12 at 15:49

I prefer the second construct...

for (int i = 0; i < someint; i++)
{
    if (i == somecondition)
    {
        DoSomething();
        //lets say lot of code
        //..
        //...
        //...
        //...
        continue;
    }
    else
    {
        doSomeOtherStuff();
    }
}

Lets say you had lot of code before the continue. It is immediately apparent just by looking

   else
    {
        doSomeOtherStuff();
    }

the it is not executed unconditionally.

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3  
+1: In an answer that has already been deleted, a member with 40k+ reputation points missed the continue statement. I think that's a pretty strong indicator that even with a relatively short if/else statement, experienced programmers can still miss it. The else block makes this much more clear. –  StriplingWarrior Jan 17 '12 at 15:55

To me, this depends on what's the split between the then and the else branch relative sizes: if one is massively larger than the other, and the smaller one represents a logically exceptional situation, I put the shorter one into then, and add a continue; when they are roughly equal, both in size and in the logic flow, I keep them in their own then and else branches.

for (String tok : tokens) {
    if (isKeyword(tok)) {
         output.write(tok);
         continue;
    }
    // Do some massive processing of non-keyword tokens here
    // This block goes on...
    // and on...
    // and on... You get the idea
}

vs.

for (String op : operators) {
    if (isAdditive(op)) {
        // Do something for additive ops
    } else {
        // Do something for non-additive ops
    }
}
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1  
If this block goes on and on and on, it's time to refactor it into a separate function (or several functions). –  James Kanze Jan 17 '12 at 17:07
1  
@JamesKanze Not necessarily so: if it turns out that the processing is unique to this block, uses locals defined outside of for, and has no chance of being reused, there is no point in creating a leaf function with a single invocation site. Although there is an added benefit of giving a nice name to this block of code, comments do as good a job at it as moving the code into a separate function. –  dasblinkenlight Jan 17 '12 at 17:38
    
In the end, it's a question of whether you want your code to be readable and maintainable. Although there are exceptions, I would generally reject any function of more than about 10 lines, or with more than one, or at the most two levels of nesting. –  James Kanze Jan 17 '12 at 18:27
    
@JamesKanze Although readability and maintainability is a subjective thing, ten line limit is overly strict: I routinely code methods with argument checks taking well over ten lines all by themselves. To me, keeping related code together is a hugely important part of maintainability. That is why as a general rule I try staying out of non-reusable functions with a single invocation sites: they break my flow of reading the code without giving me back the benefit of reusability. –  dasblinkenlight Jan 17 '12 at 18:41

I would definitely prefer the second syntax.

Try to avoid continue statements wherever possible. It makes the code path more difficult to follow and therefor difficult to debug

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As everyone said, the second form is recommended. Many coding standards recommend you to avoid "continue" and "break" statements because it adds complexity to your code.

Just to give you a reference:

JSF++ (Rule 190) and Misra C (Rule 57) say:

The continue statement shall not be used.

Those are standards for safety-critical applications, but they can be applied to other apps as well.

Misra is paid, but JSF++ can be downloaded for free here:

http://www.jsf.mil/downloads/documents/JSF_AV_C++_Coding_Standards_Rev_C.doc

It is for C++, but many rules can be applied to other languages. It worths the reading!

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2  
Not using continue will inevitably lead to unnecessary code bloat as you are forced to manually implement continue logic (likely via boolean variables). –  edA-qa mort-ora-y Jan 17 '12 at 16:19
    
@edA-qamort-ora-y You must read the standard for you to use it. In the beginning it makes difference between the usage of the words "will", "shall" and "must". The "shall" rules are recommendations, that you should use when possible. But, unless you are working with old codes, you'll rarely not be able to avoid "continues". –  Renan Greinert Jan 17 '12 at 16:28
1  
@edA-qamort-ora-y In close to 30 years of experience, I've never see such a case. Except when the function was overly complicated to begin with---in which case, the solution is to refactor it into smaller functions, not to add to the complexity of an already overly complex function. –  James Kanze Jan 17 '12 at 17:06
    
@Renan: actually "Shall" rules are completely mandatory according to JSF. To quote: "Shall rules are mandatory requirements. They must be followed and they require verification (either automatic or manual)." Deviation from a will rule or a shall rule require approval of both the product manager, and and the Engineering lead. For shall rules, the violation shall be documented in the very same file, no deviations permitted. –  Kevin Cathcart Jan 17 '12 at 17:22
    
@KevinCathcart yes, you are right. My mistake, sorry! –  Renan Greinert Jan 17 '12 at 17:50

In this particular case, I agree with everyone else that the second is preferable. But there are cases where I'd go for the first. If DoSomething() were really just that one call, and i == someCondition is an edge case, and doSomeOtherStuff() were actually 20 lines of code instead of just that one call, then I'd prefer using the continue. In that scenario, I read it as "first, let's take care of this one edge case quickly. Okay, now let's do the real stuff."

Of course, one could make the argument for the if-else by rephrasing my interpretation to "if we're in the edge case do this, else do the real stuff." But that means all those 20 lines are now one nesting deeper, and to me it's more readable to take care of the edge cases first, and then focus on the common path.

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If doSomeOtherStuff() is 20 lines of code, it should be in a separate function. –  James Kanze Jan 17 '12 at 17:08
    
@JamesKanze Maybe, maybe not. If the for loop is the only thing going on in the function, for instance, there may not be a reason to have myFunction() { for (...) { myActualFunction(); } }. And maybe those 20 lines aren't 20 statements, but include a lot of "vertical noise" (like a method with longish args that you've split over multiple lines). Or comments. Point is, it's a judgement call. –  yshavit Jan 17 '12 at 17:21

I actually do believe there is a pertinent reason to prefer the first over the second, although in most cases, the second is definetely more readable.

Say for example you have a lot, and I mean a lot of conditions inside your loop, where by having a lot of if statements actually affects readability through indentation:

for ( int i = 0 ; i < n ; i++ )
{
   if ( obj[i] )
   {
      doSomething();
      if ( someOtherCondition() 
      {
           //...........
                                                  if ( /* some levels down */ )
                                                  {

                                                  }
           //.....
      }  
   }
}

I might get arguments like "You can refactor it" blah blah, but sometimes, rarely, you simply can't.

So you can refactor and make it a lot more readable with:

for ( int i = 0 ; i < n ; i++ )
{
   if ( !obj[i] )
   {
       continue;
   }
   doSomething();
   if ( !someOtherCondition() 
   {
       continue;
   }
   //...........  
}
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I think it depends more on what you are doing.

This is a simple example, but as a rule if there is a condition that I'm "Extracting" from other loop logic, I will pull it out as quickly as possible with a continue rather than adding to the complexity of future if statements (your first example IF it is a condition that can be extracted simplifying future logic) For instance:

for ( int i = 0 ; i < n ; i++ )
{
    if( obj[i] != null && obj[i].instanceOf("A")) {
        doSomething();
    } else if(obj[i] != null && obj[i].instanceOf("B"){
        doSomethingElse();
    }
}

NOW it's clear that extracting the first condition into

if(obj[i] == null) {
    continue;
}

could save some confusion as this loop gets enhanced. I use this tactic a lot for testing method parameters and either returning early or throwing an exception.

Also (This is totally an aside, not part of the answer at all!), I'd say that if you ever see a "Truly" balanced condition you might give a serious thought to your OO design. If doSomething and someOtherCondition were that similar, they should probably be different implementations of a method defined in a base class or interface, leading to this code:

for ( int i = 0 ; i < n ; i++ )
{
    obj[i].doSomething();
}
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