Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

why does this

$html = '<a href="/browse/product.do?cid=1&amp;vid=1&amp;pid=1" class="productItemName">what is going on here</a>';

$dom = new DOMDocument();
$dom->loadhtml($html);
$xpath = new DOMXPath($dom);

$selectors['link'] = '//a/@href';
$links_nodeList = $xpath->query($selectors['link']);

foreach ($links_nodeList as $link) {
    $links[] = $link->nodeValue;
}

echo("<p>links</p>");
echo("<pre>");
print_r($links);
echo("</pre>");

output

links

Array
(
    [0] => /browse/product.do?cid=1&vid=1&pid=1
)

and not

links

Array
(
    [0] => /browse/product.do?cid=1&amp;vid=1&amp;pid=1
)

?

share|improve this question
up vote 6 down vote accepted

The answer is simple:

&amp; is a special way to represent the character "&" in an XML document.

These two denote the same character.

When the escaped form of the ampersand is output as text (not as XML), showing it as "&" is correct.

As further elaborated by @LarsH in his comment:

when you say loadhtml($html);, you are parsing the string as HTML, which means that character entities (like &amp;) are interpreted into the characters they represent (like &). If you want a string that will be interpreted as &amp;, you need to escape the ampersand, e.g. &amp;amp;

share|improve this answer
    
+1 good answer. To elaborate: when you say loadhtml($html);, you are parsing the string as HTML, which means that character entities (like &amp;) are interpreted into the characters they represent (like &). If you want a string that will be interpreted as &amp;, you need to escape the ampersand, e.g. &amp;amp;. – LarsH Jan 17 '12 at 16:29
    
@LarsH: Good additional explanation. – Dimitre Novatchev Jan 17 '12 at 17:17

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.