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I have several TSV files ranging in size from 2MB to 450MB. I need to map data from one the other and finally create a file based on these mappings. the files look like this: file 1:

cluster_123    seq1    seq2,seq3
cluster_456    seq4    seq5,seq6
cluster_789    seq7    seq8

file2:

cluster_123    id1
cluster_456    id2
seq10    id3

at first I needed to open the clusters so I could get seq:id pairs:

seq1    id1
.
.
seq10    id3

for that I have made a dictionary:

mapped_seq_id = {'seq1': id1, 'seq10': id3}

now I need to map this dictionary to a file that looks like this: file3:

id1    cluster123    function1
id3    seq10         function2

using the id from the mapped_seq_id dictionary I can now map sequences to functions. I tried created a dict for that that will hold seq:function pairs:

seq_function_dict = {'seq1': function1, 'seq2': function1, 'seq10', function2}

however since file3 is very big creating the dictionary can take hours. the function strings can be 10-20 words long. the reason I am using dictionaries here is because the is a final step where I will need to map 'seq' to another file and use that to extract another piece of information in order to create a final file that looks like this. please refer to code for more details.

final file:

seq    function    data_from_final_file

in fact, it is function create_annotated_dict that takes very long time to complete. what I would like to know is whether there is a better and faster way to do that in python other than using a dictionary?

many thanks.

EDIT: Added code:

#!/usr/bin/env python

import itertools
from collections import defaultdict
from operator import itemgetter
import string
import os
import csv
import sys

current_dir = os.getcwd()   

def create_mapping_dictionary(current_dir):
    map_file = csv.reader(open(current_dir + '/file1', "rb"), delimiter = '\t')

    #file 1 looks like this:
    #   cluster1   seq1    seq2    20%
    #   cluster2    seq3    seq4,seq5   55%
    #   cluster3    seq6    seq7,seq8,seq9  99%
    #
    # in this function I'd like to create the following dictionary:
    # map_dict = {'seq1': cluster1, 'seq2': cluster2, ...'seq6':
    # cluster3}
    mapped_file = open(current_dir + '/file1_mapped.txt', 'w')
    map_dict = dict()
    for row in map_file:
        temp = list()
        list_of_seq = str(row[2])
        last_item = (len(row) - 1)
        if ',' in b: # in row:
            temp.append(row[1])
            list_of_seq = row[2].split(',')
            for i in list_of_seq:
                    temp.append(i)

        else:
            temp.append(row[1])
            temp.append(row[2])

        for item in temp:
            map_dict[item] = row[0]
    for k,v in map_dict.iteritems():
        mapped_file.write("%s\t%s\n" % (k, v))

    map_annotation_to_sequence_headers(current_dir, map_dict)


def map_annotation_to_sequence_headers(current_dir, map_dict):

    fltered = csv.reader(open(current_dir + '/file2', "rb"), delimiter = '\t')
    ##file2 looks like this:
    #   cluster1    id1 1   55  89  10  
    #   cluster2    id2 77  88  12  876
    #   cluster3    id3 99  45  123 99
    #   seq10   id4 67  33  44  11
    #   seq11   id5 55  113 102 33
    #
    # in this function I'd like to create the following dictionary:
    # map_dict = {'seq1': id1, 'seq2': id1,...'seq6': id3, 'seq10': id4}
    #
    ids_dict = dict()
    for row in filtered:
        if 'aa90_' in row[0]:
            if row[0] in map_dict.values():
                lkeys = [key for key, value in map_dict.iteritems() if value == row[0]]
                for i in lkeys:
                    ids_dict[i] = row[1]   

        else:
            ids_dict[row[0]] = row[1]
    create_annotated_dict(current_dir, ids_dict, map_dict)

def create_annotated_dict(current_dir, ids_dict, map_dict):
    annotated = csv.reader(open(current_dir + '/file3', "rb"), delimiter = '\t')
    ##file3 looks like this:
    #   id1 cluster1   55  89  10   string1 string2 string3
    #   id1 cluster1   544  8  101   string1 string5 string3
    #   id1 cluster1   51  83  102   string1 string2 string4
    #   id2 cluster2    77  88  12  string3 string4 string3
    #   id4 seq10   33  44  11  string10 string11 string12
    #   id4 seq10   44  54  31  string10 string11 string12
    #   id4 seq10   33  44  11  string10 string13 string14
    #   
    #
    # in this function I'd like to create the following dictionary:
    # paris of seqs and list of their corresponding strings.
    # string1_2_3_4_5 = [string1, string2, string3, string4, string5]
    # annotated_dict = {'seq1': string1_2_3_4_5 , 'seq2':
    # string1_2_3_4_5,...'seq10': string10_11_12_13_14}
    #
    annotated_dict = dict()
    for ids, lines in itertools.groupby(annotated, itemgetter(0)):
        temp_list = list()
        for row in lines:
            if ids in ids_dict.values(): 
                t = row[6].split(' ')
                tax = ' '.join(t[0:2])
                if row[5] not in temp_list:
                    temp_list.append(row[5])
                if tax not in temp_list:
                    temp_list.append(tax)
                if row[7] not in temp_list:
                    temp_list.append(row[7])
                if row[8] not in temp_list:
                    temp_list.append(row[8])

            if 'cluster' in row[1]:
                if row[1] in map_dict.values():
                    lkeys = [ key for key, value in map_dict.iteritems() if value == row[1]]
                    for i in lkeys:
                        annotated_dict[i] = temp_list
            else:   
                annotated_dict[row[1]] = temp_list
        temp_list = list()
    create_fasta(current_dir, annotated_diact)

def create_fasta(current_dir, annotated_dict):
    flat_fasta= csv.reader(open(current_dir + '/file4', "rb"), delimiter = '\t')
    ##file looks like this:
    #   >seq1   ACTGAGTAGCAGTAGCAGATGAC
    #   >seq2   ACATGACAAAACTATCTATCCCA
    #   >seq3   ACGATGAGTGACGATGAGTCAGT
    #   
    # in this function I need to atach to each seq it corresponding
    # annotation drom the annotated dict and to create a file that look
    # like this:
    #   >seq1  string1_2_3_4_5
    #   ACTGAGTAGCAGTAGCAGATGAC

    out_fasta = open(current_dir + 'fasta.out', 'w')

    for row in flat_fasta:
        seq_name = flat_fasta[0]replace('>','')
        if seq_name in annotated_dict.keys():
            annotation= annotated_dict[seq_name]
            annotated_string= ' '.join(annotation)
            new_header = '>' + seq_name + ' ' + annotated_string
            #print new_header
            out_fasta.write("%s\n%s\n" % (new_header, row[1]))
        else:
            #this seq had no annotation'
            out_fasta.write("%s%s\n%s\n" % ('>', row[1]))
    out_fasta.close()

create_mapping_dictionary(current_dir)
share|improve this question
    
Maybe you are in a kind of task that would be better addressed by using SQL –  jsbueno Jan 17 '12 at 16:16
    
"however since file3 is very big creating the dictionary can take hours". Show the code, please. This should not take any more time than required to simply read "file3". Note that "file3" is not described in the question. For that matter, the "sequence" to "id" mapping is not explained in the question either. –  S.Lott Jan 17 '12 at 16:49
    
thanks for reading and commenting. I have added code. I hope it'll make things clearer. @Don Question - thanks for noticing. corrected to the right brackets. –  Schrodinger's Cat Jan 17 '12 at 20:29
1  
Without changing general approach: replace if seq_name in annotated_dict.keys(): by if seq_name in annotated_dict:. Replace all if value in some_dict.values() inside nested loops with values = set(some_dict.values()) .. for .. for .. if value in values: (if some_dict is constant during iteration). If temp_list can be large then use temp_set = set() and if val not in temp_set: temp_set.add() instead of if val not in temp_list: temp_list.append(). As @jsbueno said: consider using SQL e.g., via sqlite module. There is a typo: annotated_diact –  J.F. Sebastian Jan 17 '12 at 21:27
    
run python -mcProfile your_script.py with a smaller dataset. –  J.F. Sebastian Jan 17 '12 at 21:33

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Without changing general approach:

  • replace if seq_name in annotated_dict.keys(): by if seq_name in annotated_dict:
  • replace all if value in some_dict.values() inside nested loops with:

    values = set(some_dict.values())
    for .. 
        for .. 
           if value in values: 
    

    (if some_dict is constant during iteration)

  • If temp_list can be large then use temp_set = set() and if val not in temp_set: temp_set.add() instead of if val not in temp_list: temp_list.append().

As @jsbueno said: consider using SQL e.g., via sqlite module.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks very much for your answer, @J.F.Sebastian. so, would you say that it was regular dictionary lookup that slowed things down? also, wouldn't sqlite be slower that this? –  Schrodinger's Cat Jan 18 '12 at 16:41
1  
@Schrodinger's Cat: 1. In Python 2.x .keys(), .values() return new lists each time (O(n) operation (linear time -- the more elements the longer it takes)). A Lookup in a list is also O(n) operation. Compare it to item in some_dict (lookup in a dictionary) that is amortized O(1) (constant time). Run a profiler to find out where your program spends most time. 2. The description of input/output is not clear to me, but it seems that SQL might be a natural language to express the operations that your code does i.e, your program would be more clear, simple, maybe faster. –  J.F. Sebastian Jan 18 '12 at 20:34
    
thanks very much! –  Schrodinger's Cat Jan 31 '12 at 15:36

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