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I am having a column named DP as shown:

 07-APR-2011
 12-APR-2011
 26-APR-2011

Now to retrieve the query for selecting the payments made in the month of april i came across a query

select * from payments where instr(dp,'APR')<>0

Okay , i am well acquainted with INSTR function and > sign , but cant interpret the logic with<> sign here !

[UPDATE]

i am also aware that <> is equivalent of != . But my point is we could have used
instr(dp,'APR') instead of doing instr(dp,'APR')<>0

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5  
<> is Not Equals - basically it's checking that a substring of APR appears in the string. –  JNK Jan 17 '12 at 16:22
1  
it's a functional equivalent of !=, if you've seen that in other languages. –  Marc B Jan 17 '12 at 16:25
1  
@kushal: No, you couldn't have. Oracle doesn't treat integers as booleans. –  ruakh Jan 17 '12 at 16:28
1  
The Oracle online documentation is free and comprehensive. You should learn to use it. You could easily have answered this question yourself by looking in the SQL Reference. docs.oracle.com/cd/E11882_01/server.112/e26088/… –  APC Jan 17 '12 at 16:29
2  
if you get a hit on 'APR', the offset will be > 0. You could also write where instr(dp,'APR') > 0 (for your example, "where 4 > 0"). On a related note, storing dates as strings (and then doing this hack) makes me cringe a bit. –  tbone Jan 17 '12 at 17:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

<> means "is not equal to". You can also write !=, if you prefer.

instr(dp,'APR') returns zero if 'APR' is not a substring of dp, so instr(dp,'APR')<>0 means "'APR' is a substring of dp". It could also be written as dp LIKE '%APR%'.

Update for updated question:

But my point is we could have used instr(dp,'APR') instead of doing instr(dp,'APR')<>0

No, you couldn't have. Some dialects of SQL treat zero as "false" and other integers as "true", but Oracle does not do this. It treats integers and Booleans as separate types, and does not implicitly convert between them. WHERE 0 is not a valid WHERE-clause.

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That i know ,but i cant guess the logic of using it here. –  kushal Jan 17 '12 at 16:23
    
@kushal: I've updated my answer. –  ruakh Jan 17 '12 at 16:27
    
Thanks man , this answered my question . –  kushal Jan 17 '12 at 16:36
    
@kushal: You're welcome! –  ruakh Jan 17 '12 at 16:37

<> is Not Equals - basically it's checking that a substring of 'APR' appears in the string.

If that function returned 0 then it would indicate 'APR' does not appear anywhere in the string to be searched.

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