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What's the regex for a date with no date value ("--") and no separator?

Format: YYYYMM--

201201--

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Do you need to accept years <=999? Will years in those ranges be zero padded? E.g. 0999? –  Mike Clark Jan 17 '12 at 18:13

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
  ([12][0-9]{3})(0[1-9]|1[0-2])--

… handles dates from 100001-- to 299912--

Edit corrected dates per @m42, oops!

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0[0-9] should be 0[1-9] –  JE SUIS CHARLIE Jan 17 '12 at 17:04
    
Thanks, yesterday was an holiday in the US, so I'm doing my Monday Morning typos a day late :-] –  BRPocock Jan 17 '12 at 17:05
    
I've removed some unnecessary backslashes; you might also want to add a \b before the regex to make sure the match starts at a "word boundary" (and not as a submatch of 9876543210012-- or something like it). –  Tim Pietzcker Jan 17 '12 at 17:23
    
ah, I tend to over-escape these things, as I rarely find a language that gripes about too many backslashes, but frequently have troubles with too few :-) But thanks anyway. And, yes, this doesn't handle anchoring at all. –  BRPocock Jan 17 '12 at 17:27

The code to match it as a year.month.

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
  class Program
  {
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
      string txt="201201--";

      string re1="((?:[0]?[1-9]|[1][012])(?:(?:[0-2]?\\d{1})|(?:[3][01]{1}))(?:(?:[1]{1}\\d{1}\\d{1}\\d{1})|(?:[2]{1}\\d{3})))(?![\\d])";
      string re2="(-)";
      string re3="(-)";

      Regex r = new Regex(re1+re2+re3,RegexOptions.IgnoreCase|RegexOptions.Singleline);
      Match m = r.Match(txt);
      if (m.Success)
      {
            String mmddyyyy1=m.Groups[1].ToString();
            String c1=m.Groups[2].ToString();
            String c2=m.Groups[3].ToString();
            Console.Write("("+mmddyyyy1.ToString()+")"+"("+c1.ToString()+")"+"("+c2.ToString()+")"+"\n");
      }
      Console.ReadLine();
    }
  }
}
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