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I know there is a way for writing java if statement in short form

if (city.getName() != null) {
    name = city.getName();
} else {
    name="N/A";
}

does anyone know how to write short form for above 5 lines into one line...

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1  
google ternary operator in java :) –  CoolBeans Jan 17 '12 at 17:00
1  
I assume you got your if logic the wrong way round. –  NPE Jan 17 '12 at 17:00
2  
if (city.getName()!=null){name = city.getName();}else{name="N/A"} –  Steve Kuo Jan 17 '12 at 17:03
5  
@SteveKuo There are three spaces you can remove. ;) –  Peter Lawrey Jan 17 '12 at 17:05
    
if (city.getName()!= null) name = city.getName(); else name="N/A"; –  Anton Dozortsev Jan 2 '14 at 14:37

5 Answers 5

up vote 60 down vote accepted

Use the ternary operator:

name = ((city.getName() == null) ? "N/A" : city.getName());

I think you have the conditions backwards - if it's null, you want the value to be "N/A".

What if city is null? Your code *hits the bed in that case. I'd add another check:

name = ((city == null) || (city.getName() == null) ? "N/A" : city.getName());

I'll follow along with the (very good) example below:

name = ((city == null) || (city.getName() == null) ? "N/A" : city.getName());
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3  
+1, though you have redundant parentheses. I would have written: name = city.getName() == null ? "N/A" : city.getName(); –  Andres F. Jan 17 '12 at 17:02
2  
A matter of style and taste: I like to make the grouping of the boolean clause clear. –  duffymo Jan 17 '12 at 17:06
1  
Whatever - I used DeMorgan's theorem and got what you needed. No need to edit, as long as you express the logic correctly. –  duffymo Jan 17 '12 at 17:08
    
The logic is correct. The only possible flaw with this answer is if city is mutable. –  emory Jan 17 '12 at 18:16
1  
Won't String cityName = city.getName(); throw a NullPointerException if city == null? I'd therefore say your middle solution is definitely the best (PS and I approve of the 'unnecessary' parentheses! People need to remember that 99% of coding is communicating with other people (and your future self), not the compiler - otherwise we'd use c!) –  Alex Apr 25 '13 at 1:27

The way to do it is with ternary operator:

name = city.getName() == null ? city.getName() : "N/A"

However, I believe you have a typo in your code above, and you mean to say:

if (city.getName() != null) ...
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thx i've updatde question. –  Makky Jan 17 '12 at 17:02

To avoid calling .getName() twice I would use

name = city.getName();
if (name == null) name = "N/A";
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1  
In a multi user system with a mutable city, there could be an intervening city.setName(null). Your answer neatly handles that. –  emory Jan 17 '12 at 18:14

sorry I had a sleepless night
EDIT:
name = city.getName()==null ? city.getName() : "N/A";

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6  
Why is everyone upvoting uncompilable code? –  BalusC Jan 17 '12 at 17:00
    
You must move out the assignment itself, by starting with name = .... You can only include expressions, not statements in a ?: construct. –  Andres F. Jan 17 '12 at 17:07
1  
I know I just edited the answer. I would vote down it if I could. –  shift66 Jan 17 '12 at 17:11
name = ((city.getName()==null)?city.getName():"N/A")
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