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Let's say I have this object:

[JsonObject]
public class User
{
    [JsonProperty(PropertyName = "id")]
    public string Id { get; set; }

    [JsonProperty(PropertyName = "name")]
    public string Name { get; set; }

    [JsonProperty(PropertyName = "birthday")]
    public DateTime Birthday { get; set; }
}

This will produce JSON like this:

{
   "id":null,
   "name":"Bob",
   "birthday":"/Date(374479200000-0600)/"
}

I'm looking for a way to add the classname around all this, for example:

{
   "user":{
      "id":null,
      "name":"Bob",
      "birthday":"/Date(374479200000-0600)/"
   }
}

Does JSON.NET have a way to do this? Thanks!

Edit

My reason for doing this was to connect a .NET client to a Rails web service. Rails puts a model's attributes under a namespace, so I was looking for a way for .NET to conform to this.

However, after reading a bit about Backbone.js, it looks like a possible alternative would be to disable this behavior in Rails:

If you're working with a Rails backend, you'll notice that Rails' default to_json implementation includes a model's attributes under a namespace. To disable this behavior for seamless Backbone integration, set:

ActiveRecord::Base.include_root_in_json = false

share|improve this question
    
sounds like you need DataContractJsonSerializer.. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… – MethodMan Jan 17 '12 at 17:19
    
@DJKRAZE: I appreciate your response, but can you please point me to an example usage that accomplishes my goal? Thanks! – Samo Jan 17 '12 at 17:32
    
    
@DJKRAZE: I appreciate the links but they don't really show that the resulting JSON has the class name wrapped around the POCO properties. I know I could just try it, but your suggestion would be much more helpful with an example that actually demonstrates my goal being achieved. – Samo Jan 17 '12 at 19:24
up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you want to do this just for the root object, I think the simplest way is just to enclose the object in a way that it gets serialized the way you want:

static object AddTypeName(object o)
{
    return new Dictionary<string, object> 
    {
        { o.GetType().Name.ToLowerInvariant(), o }
    };
}
share|improve this answer
    
This seems like a very clean way to do it from the .NET side. It turns out, the question I should've been asking is how to REMOVE the namespace on the Rails side. I've edited my question to show that solution. Thanks for your tip! – Samo Mar 14 '12 at 20:41

I achieved this personally using JavaScriptSerializer.Serialize(Object):

JavaScriptSerializer javaScriptSerializer = new JavascriptSerializer();
javaScriptSerializer.Serialize( new { user = userObject } );

That should automatically deserialize the following class:

class User 
{ 
    string id;
    int age;
}

into this:

{
    user : {
        id = '12321345',
        age = 32
    }
}
share|improve this answer

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