Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am testing a php script that has been developed on an OS-X system at Debian and it behaves different there.

To reproduce it I wrote two scripts: parent.php and child.php:

parent.php:

#!/usr/bin/php
<?php

echo "parent started...\n";
shell_exec(__DIR__ . '/child.php &2>/dev/null &');
echo "parent finished.\n";

child.php:

#!/usr/bin/php
<?php

echo "child started...\n";
sleep(5);
echo "child finished.\n";

Running parent.php on OS-X I get back imediately the two output lines (parent started, parent finished). On Debian I get the "parent started..." line, then a delay of 5 seconds an then the "parent finished.". Running "./child.php &2>/dev/null &" in the shell gives me back the prompt imediately as expected. Any ideas how I can fix this?

share|improve this question
2  
While I'm sure it's just a shorthand I've never seen before, since you say it works, I usually write that exec line as {cmd} > /dev/null 2>&1 & - would be interested to know if that makes a difference. –  DaveRandom Jan 17 '12 at 17:12
    
Did you mean to suppress errors by &2>/dev/null or just want to suppress any output? –  shiplu.mokadd.im Jan 17 '12 at 17:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is because &2> part. It may not be supported in all systems. Also in every shell (bash, sh, ksh etc).

Try this,

 exec("/bin/bash -c '/usr/bin/php /path/to/child.php 2> /dev/null' &");

If you want to suppress all the output use this,

 exec("/bin/bash -c '/usr/bin/php /path/to/child.php &> /dev/null ' &");

BASH-HOWTO

Just tested, exec("/usr/bin/php /path/to/child.php > /dev/null 2>&1 &") should work too.

share|improve this answer
    
Your last line is missing the & on the end to separate the child process from the parent –  DaveRandom Jan 17 '12 at 17:46
    
@dave Thanks. Missed it as I typed too quickly. –  shiplu.mokadd.im Jan 17 '12 at 18:04
    
Thank you. Works great! –  stofl Jan 18 '12 at 9:53

Try with exec() or system() instead of shell_exec, maybe shell_exec has not the same behavior on different OS.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.