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We use zero-width regex strings to specify the places in a string of amino acid symbols (basically A-Z) that are valid cleavage sites. For example, the proteolytic enzyme trypsin cleaves after K or R except when followed by P ((?<=[KR])(?!P)). I want to convert these regexes to the "cut/no-cut" notation also common in this field. For example, trypsin cuts after "KR" with a no-cut of "P". My first attempt at this works for simple cases:

// match zero or one regex term like (?<=[KR]) or (?<=K) or (?<![KR]) or (?<!K)
// followed by zero or one term like (?=[KR]) or (?=K) or (?![KR]) or (?!K)
boost::regex cutNoCutRegex("(?:\\(+\\?<([=!])(\\[[A-Z]+\\]|[A-Z])\\)+)?(?:\\(+\\?([=!])(\\[[A-Z]+\\]|[A-Z])\\)+)?");

Without the C++ escaping, that's:

(?:\(+\?<([=!])(\[[A-Z]+\]|[A-Z])\)+)?(?:\(+\?([=!])(\[[A-Z]+\]|[A-Z])\)+)?

I'd like to change this to support somewhat more complicated regexes, such as multiple characters, non-capturing groups, character sets, ranges in character sets, negated sets, and start/end of string: (?<=K|R) or (?<=(?:K)|(?:R)) or (?<=[^A-JL-QS-Z]) or (?<=^M|[KR])

These extra features would seem to explode the complexity of the regex. I'm pretty sure I'll need to enable the "experimental" BOOST_REGEX_MATCH_EXTRA feature of Boost.Regex. Is there a better way to do what I'm doing? Am I missing some other regex possibilities in zero-width regexes?

Here is pseudo-code for my unit tests for the existing code covering many of the simple cases. The "sense" member is "C" when the "cut" field corresponds to the look-behind, and "N" when the "cut" field corresponds to the look-ahead. The current pepXMLSpecificity() function can invert the character set if it would produce a shorter list.

struct PepXMLSpecificity { std::string cut, no_cut, sense; };
void unit_assert_equal(string expected, string actual);

"(?<=[QWERTY])(?=[QWERTY])"
result = pepXMLSpecificity(ez);
unit_assert_equal("C", result.sense);
unit_assert_equal("QWERTY", result.cut);
unit_assert_equal("ABCDFGHIJKLMNOPSUVZ", result.no_cut);

"(?<![QWERTY])(?![QWERTY])"
result = pepXMLSpecificity(ez);
unit_assert_equal("C", result.sense);
unit_assert_equal("ABCDFGHIJKLMNOPSUVZ", result.cut);
unit_assert_equal("QWERTY", result.no_cut);

"(?<=[QWERTY])"
result = pepXMLSpecificity(ez);
unit_assert_equal("C", result.sense);
unit_assert_equal("QWERTY", result.cut);
unit_assert_equal("", result.no_cut);

"(?=[QWERTY])"
result = pepXMLSpecificity(ez);
unit_assert_equal("N", result.sense);
unit_assert_equal("QWERTY", result.cut);
unit_assert_equal("", result.no_cut);

"(?<![QWERTY])"
result = pepXMLSpecificity(ez);
unit_assert_equal("C", result.sense);
unit_assert_equal("ABCDFGHIJKLMNOPSUVZ", result.cut);
unit_assert_equal("", result.no_cut);

"(?![QWERTY])"
result = pepXMLSpecificity(ez);
unit_assert_equal("N", result.sense);
unit_assert_equal("ABCDFGHIJKLMNOPSUVZ", result.cut);
unit_assert_equal("", result.no_cut);

// the following tests aren't supported yet

"(?<=^M)|(?<=[KR])"
unit_assert_equal("N", result.sense);
unit_assert_equal("KR", result.cut); // the 'M' part is dropped
unit_assert_equal("", result.no_cut);

"(?<=K|R)"
unit_assert_equal("C", result.sense);
unit_assert_equal("KR", result.cut);
unit_assert_equal("", result.no_cut);

"(?<=(?:K)|(?:R))"
unit_assert_equal("C", result.sense);
unit_assert_equal("KR", result.cut);
unit_assert_equal("", result.no_cut);

"(?<=[^A-JL-QS-Z])(?!P)"
unit_assert_equal("C", result.sense);
unit_assert_equal("KR", result.cut);
unit_assert_equal("P", result.no_cut);
share|improve this question
    
The proteolytic enzyme trypsin, you say... hmm... –  Armen Tsirunyan Jan 17 '12 at 17:57
4  
It might be easier and faster to implement a parser than to get the regular expressions to work. –  zneak Jan 17 '12 at 17:58
    
@zneak: I thought about that, and it would probably be easier to read the code, but I don't think it would be any less complex. –  Matt Chambers Jan 17 '12 at 18:08
1  
Let me rephrase your question: You have a regexp $R that you expect to be equivalent with (?<$X)$Y. You want to get '$X' and '$Y' from '$R'. This is possible for regular $X or $Y, although hard. Were you happy with a purely syntactic solution, you could probably use some simple parser (Boost.Spirit?, Yacc?) that could pick the two parts. –  jpalecek Jan 17 '12 at 18:22
2  
If you really need to be able to handle any valid look-behind, then this is not possible in a true regular expression, because you'd need to handle recursive nesting. For example, (?<=(?!L)[A-Z]) is a valid way of writing (?<=[A-KM-Z]). You can use something like boost-sandbox.sourceforge.net/libs/xpressive/doc/html/…, but I'm really betting it'll be much more trouble than it's worth. I think you should take a step back and consider if you really need to take this approach. –  ruakh Jan 17 '12 at 18:36

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As I understand it the situation is, you have a library of existing regexes which, when applied to common string representations of aminio-acid sequences, identify probable cut-points for a proteolytic enzyme.

You want to automatically produce a standard textual description of the cutpoints implied by the regex.

Observations:

  • You don't need to be able to parse arbitrary regexes, you only need to be able to parse the cases that you actually have in your library.

  • You don't necessarily need to parse all of them. Particularly difficult ones could be kicked out and done by hand provided there weren't too many of them.

Really I think you need to do the following.

  1. pepXMLSpecificity needs to return one or more descriptions, i.e. a vector<struct PepXMLSpecificity>, since a regex can be authored to combine arbitrary regexes cf. jpalacek's comment.

  2. You should tackle the actual contents of your library of regexes starting with the common cases and working down, and just add special cases for each common type of regex until you have got them all (or at least enough of them to satisfy your boss).

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately there's not really a library outside the regexes that I already support. Users could enter any arbitrary zero-width regex though. I am beginning to think that it's ok to fail on some of the more complicated cases though - our alternative output format (not pepXML) supports the regexes natively so it's reasonable to make people use that for complex regexes. Thanks. –  Matt Chambers Jan 19 '12 at 18:02

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