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This may be a stupid question but one that is throwing me for a loop.

I have implemented a singleton class (I know they are evil) using an enum in Java as follows

public enum Edit {

   INSTANCE;

   private TreeSet<String> list1 = new TreeSet<String>();

   public void createList(Scanner input) {
        while (input.hasNext()) {
            list1.add(input.next());
        }

My question is what happens with the TreeSet when you use the createList method in more than one place in the application?

For example say the first time Edit.INSTANCE.createList() is called in the application,10 Strings are added to list1, now the second time it is called, 5 Strings are added to list1....will those new 5 strings be added to the TreeSet with the previous 10 Strings or will they be added to a completely different (new) TreeSet?

I know the purpose of a singleton class is to make sure that there is one and only one global instance of the class but does that hold true for the class member variables? Is there only one copy of list1 in the above example or each time the createList() method is called is a new TreeSet created?

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It might be worthwhile first learning a bit more about the basics of OOP before delving into subjects as this. I have the impression you don't fully grasp what classes are yet. –  Steven Jeuris Jan 17 '12 at 18:57
    
Wrong sir, I do have a good idea about what classes are. This was a question I wanted clarification on because I know that singletons are thought of as bad and I would like to understand them fully. –  Hexose Jan 17 '12 at 19:03
    
In that case you answered the question yourself: "I know the purpose of a singleton class is to make sure that there is one and only one global instance of the class" –  Steven Jeuris Jan 17 '12 at 19:08
    
@Steven Jeuris maybe my question was not as clear as I hoped it would be. It has to do more with the member variables inside a singleton rather than the singleton itself. See my comment to Jon Skeet's answer to see why I was asking. –  Hexose Jan 17 '12 at 19:18
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There's just a single instance of the Edit type, so there's a single TreeSet<String>.

Each time you call createList, it will add more values to the same TreeSet.

You say:

I know the purpose of a singleton class is to make sure that there is one and only one global instance of the class but does that hold true for the class member variables?

If it didn't hold for member variables, what would be the point? That's what's interesting about a single instance - it has its own state.

In general, it's a very bad idea for an enum to be mutable - usually they're meant to represent specific values, potentially with behaviour. Likewise I rarely have mutable singletons - it introduces threading issues etc, as you naturally have shared state.

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I dont know where ArrayList came from either, sorry post edited. –  Hexose Jan 17 '12 at 19:02
    
@Hexose: Okay, I've removed that sentence. Does the rest of it make sense? –  Jon Skeet Jan 17 '12 at 19:03
    
@ Jon Skeet Yes it does make sense(thank you) and you have confirmed my initial thoughts. But what is confusing me is that I have one input file, that I am using this singleton to essentially chop up and output to different text files.(code in the post is not the exact code I am using.) The first time createList is called, I print out the first file. When the second file is created it does not contain any of the information from the first file. I thought it should contain information from the fist file based on the TreeSet being in a singleton class. –  Hexose Jan 17 '12 at 19:12
    
@Hexose: It's not clear why you'd use a singleton at all for that, but it's hard to diagnose what's going on based on just that description. I suggest you create a separate question with a short but complete example that demonstrates the problem. –  Jon Skeet Jan 17 '12 at 19:21
    
I figured out my confusions, thank you for the helpful post and followups. Much appreciated. –  Hexose Jan 18 '12 at 14:09
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.will those new 5 strings be added to the TreeSet with the previous 10 Strings or will they be added to a completely different (new) TreeSet?

They will be added to the same instance of TreeSet. There is no other instance of TreeSet anyway to add to. Thats because the enclosing type Edit is declared as Enum , and with only 1 instance in it INSTANCE.

If you had two instances declared into the Edit type ( INSTANCE1 , INSTANCE2; ) , then there would be two separate TreeSet instances , one with each INSTANCE member of the Edit type.

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+1 For the "two instances" caveat. –  OldCurmudgeon Jan 17 '12 at 19:35
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