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How do i construct a LINQ WHERE clause that contains OR?


i have a list of objects, and i want to return those that match a search criteria.

The contained objects have many properties, and as long as any match the criteria, i want to return it:

IEnumerable<Item> list;
String keyword; 
...

var results = list.Where(
      (item => item.Name.Contains(keyword, StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase))
      ||
      (item => item.Description.Contains(keyword, StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase))
      ||
      (item => item.Description.Contains(keyword, StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase))
      ||
      (item => item.ItemType.Contains(keyword, StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase))
      ||
      (item => item.ItemID.ToString().StartsWith(keyword, StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase))
      ||
      (items => items.Value.ToString().StartsWith(keyword, StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase))
);

But that fails to compile:

Operator '||' cannot be applied to operands of type 'lambda expression' and 'lambda expression'

How do i construct a LINQ WHERE clause that contains OR?

See also

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5 Answers 5

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Just do all your tests in the same lambda expression...

IEnumerable<Item> list;
String keyword; 
...

var results = list.Where(
      item => item.Name.Contains(keyword, StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase)
      || item.Description.Contains(keyword, StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase)
      || item.Description.Contains(keyword, StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase)
      || item.ItemType.Contains(keyword, StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase)
      || item.ItemID.ToString().StartsWith(keyword, StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase)
      || items.Value.ToString().StartsWith(keyword, StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase)
);
share|improve this answer
    
I'm curious as to why this answer got 6 upvotes, and the other three essentially identical ones received none, especially since this was the latest answer added. –  Esoteric Screen Name Jan 17 '12 at 19:08
    
@EsotericScreenName, check the times again: it was the first answer... –  Thomas Levesque Jan 17 '12 at 19:11
    
You're right, I had my conception of the meaning of "x minutes ago" backwards. –  Esoteric Screen Name Jan 17 '12 at 19:17
    
@EsotericScreenName i would also say it got my upvote, and accept, because he took the time to copy-paste-fix the entire example from the source (and formatted nicely). The extra work get's extra love. –  Ian Boyd Jan 17 '12 at 20:02
    
@IanBoyd: It consists of various typos: items instead of item, duplication of item.Description.Contains... clause. –  pad Jan 17 '12 at 20:06

You can't combine multiple lambdas, you want to build a boolean expression based on an the or (||) combination of your conditions within the where clause:

var results = list.Where( item => item.Name.Contains(keyword, StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase))
                          || item.Description.Contains(keyword, StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase))
share|improve this answer

You're trying to express each condition inside of a separate lambda expression which is incorrect.

You want to have all of your expressions inside of a single lambda expression:

var results = list.Where(item =>
    (item.Name.Contains(keyword, StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase))
    || (item.Description.Contains(keyword, StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase))
    || (item.Description.Contains(keyword, StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase))
    // and so on
);
share|improve this answer

Try removing the lambda declaration on every comparison... something like:

var results = list.Where( (item => item.Name.Contains(keyword, StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase) || item.Description.Contains(keyword, StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase) || item.Description.Contains(keyword, StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase) || item.ItemType.Contains(keyword, StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase) || item.ItemID.ToString().StartsWith(keyword, StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase) || items.Value.ToString().StartsWith(keyword, StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase) );

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Just a different approach which I think is interesting; it allows a more composable solution if you want it. You can use a version of Predicate Builder modified for linq-to-objects. Like this:

var predicate = DelegatePredicateBuilder.False<Item>();

predicate.Or (x => x.Name.Contains(keyword))
         .Or (x => x.Description.Contains(keyword))
         .Or (x => x.ItemID.ToString().StartsWith(keyword))
         .Or (...); // etc

var results = list.Where(predicate);

I've trimmed some of the boilerplate code to just show the gist of the idea.

The linq-to-objects predicate builder is from an answer by Jon Skeet. Code posted here for completeness:

public static class DelegatePredicateBuilder
{
  public static Func<T, bool> True<T>()  { return f => true;  }
  public static Func<T, bool> False<T>() { return f => false; }

  public static Func<T, bool> Or<T>(this Func<T, bool> expr1,
                                 Func<T, bool> expr2)
  {
    return t => expr1(t) || expr2(t);
  }

  public static Func<T, bool> And<T>(this Func<T, bool> expr1,
                                          Func<T, bool> expr2)
  {
   return t => expr1(t) && expr2(t);
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This looks extraordinarily useful; although i have no idea what i'm looking at. C# really is starting to combine the blazing speed of Java with the elegant readability of perl. –  Ian Boyd Jan 17 '12 at 20:06
    
@IanBoyd I first saw the source for predicate builder years ago. To this day, I still need to see it used to understand it. –  Paul Phillips Jan 17 '12 at 20:16

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