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>>> x=[1,2]
>>> x[1]
2
>>> x=(1,2)
>>> x[1]
2

Are they both valid? Is one preferred for some reason?

share|improve this question
    
Just FYI: there's a more profound difference between (i for i in ...) and [i for i in ...]. – Rik Poggi Jan 17 '12 at 21:28
1  
@RikPoggi What is the profound difference? Could you please elaborate? – qazwsx Jan 17 '12 at 21:49
5  
The first one is a generator expression and the second one is a list comprehension. You can found some informations here: Official Tutorial on List Comprehension, PEP 289. And here in some OS questions: Generator Expressions vs. List Comprehension, generator-comprehension. – Rik Poggi Jan 17 '12 at 22:08
up vote 120 down vote accepted

Square brackets are lists while parentheses are tuples.

A list is mutable, meaning you can change its contents:

>>> x = [1,2]
>>> x.append(3)
>>> x
[1, 2, 3]

while tuples are not:

>>> x = (1,2)
>>> x
(1, 2)
>>> x.append(3)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
AttributeError: 'tuple' object has no attribute 'append'

The other main difference is that a tuple is hashable, meaning that you can use it as a key to a dictionary, among other things. For example:

>>> x = (1,2)
>>> y = [1,2]
>>> z = {}
>>> z[x] = 3
>>> z
{(1, 2): 3}
>>> z[y] = 4
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: unhashable type: 'list'

Note that, as many people have pointed out, you can add tuples together. For example:

>>> x = (1,2)
>>> x += (3,)
>>> x
(1, 2, 3)

However, this does not mean tuples are mutable. In the example above, a new tuple is constructed by adding together the two tuples as arguments. The original tuple is not modified. To demonstrate this, consider the following:

>>> x = (1,2)
>>> y = x
>>> x += (3,)
>>> x
(1, 2, 3)
>>> y
(1, 2)

Whereas, if you were to construct this same example with a list, y would also be updated:

>>> x = [1, 2]
>>> y = x
>>> x += [3]
>>> x
[1, 2, 3]
>>> y
[1, 2, 3]
share|improve this answer
    
Indeed, we CAN appends things to a tuple as (1,2) + (3,) # (1,2,3) or (1,2) + (3,4) # (1,2,3,4) but we cannot EDIT things. – Alexis Paques Feb 23 at 15:43
    
@AlexisPaques - that's not really an append, since the original tuples are not modified. You're creating a new tuple as the result of adding together the two existing tuples. – jterrace Feb 23 at 16:48
    
Indeed, you are right. My mistake – Alexis Paques Feb 24 at 17:14
1  
I updated the answer to give some examples about that. – jterrace Feb 24 at 19:40

They are not lists, they are a list and a tuple. You can read about tuples in the Python tutorial. While you can mutate lists, this is not possible with tuples.

In [1]: x = (1, 2)

In [2]: x[0] = 3
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
TypeError                                 Traceback (most recent call last)

/home/user/<ipython console> in <module>()

TypeError: 'tuple' object does not support item assignment
share|improve this answer

Comma-separated items enclosed by ( and ) are tuples, those enclosed by [ and ] are lists.

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1  
There are no lists that are enclosed by "round" brackets, they are tuples! But you probably mean the right thing. :P – Gandaro Jan 17 '12 at 19:07
1  
Lists enclosed by ( and ) are tuples .. I'm confused, are they lists or tuples? – juliomalegria Jan 17 '12 at 19:33
    
@julio.alegria I think what @FlopCoder meant to write was "Items enclosed by ( and ) are tuples, those enclosed by [ and ] are lists." – funroll May 29 '12 at 11:08
    
Yeah, exactly :) – 0605002 May 29 '12 at 11:10

The first is a list, the second is a tuple. Lists are mutable, tuples are not.

Take a look at the Data Structures section of the tutorial, and the Sequence Types section of the documentation.

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