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I want to visualize a table of stock-price data as candlesticks; and as trend lines.

I'm looking for a C-callable library that will take as input raw price data and come out with a graphic file -- a picture -- that I can store someplace and then name in the HTML page that my CGI generates.

I suppose that there are many candidates. I find only three possibilities so far this morning:

  1. the boost graphics interface language
  2. imagemagick
  3. gnuplot
  4. I can also imagine drawing directly on the HTML5 canvas. I know less than nothing about that approach.

Can you recommend an approach/library that's straightforward, flexible, rich, and powerful?

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migrated from programmers.stackexchange.com Jan 17 '12 at 19:04

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If your objective is to display this data in HTML, then I would consider just using the Canvas element to render it. I suggest you search Google for HTML5 Chart. –  gahooa Jan 17 '12 at 13:56
    
@gahooa -- thanks, I'll take your suggestion. –  Pete Wilson Jan 18 '12 at 21:50

1 Answer 1

up vote 10 down vote accepted

The GD library is useful for creating dynamic PNGs.

It is written in C, has good language bindings for PHP, Perl and many other languages, and there are some command line tools for shell programming.

See this question for C programming with GD:

Looking for GD tutorial in C/C++

A Perl library on top of GD that does what you want is here:

https://metacpan.org/pod/GD::Graph::candlesticks

The code sample in there is easy to read, even if you haven't tried perl yet. Then use it as a plain old CGI Script. Or try something more fancy.

Examples:

Candlestick

Trendline

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1  
hanks! @knb answers exactly the question I asked. Others have mentioned HTML 5 solutions, which I want to look at, too. But gdlib looks perfect iff I really want to draw pics on the server. Plus the docs are outstanding. –  Pete Wilson Jan 17 '12 at 15:55

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