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I have the following program

import java.util.*;
public class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Integer[] array = { 3, 1, 4, 1, 5, 9 };
        Arrays.sort(array, new Comparator<Integer>() {
            public int compare(Integer i1, Integer i2) {
                return i1 < i2 ? -1 : (i2 > i1 ? 1 : 0);
            }
        });
        System.out.println(Arrays.toString(array));
    }
}

This gives me the output [3, 1, 4, 1, 5, 9]. Why?

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ohh shit...you all are right....looks like i need to go home..it already 14 hrs i am continuously working.. –  Saurabh Kumar Jan 17 '12 at 20:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You test for i1 < i2, and, if it fails, you test NOT for i1 > i2, but for i2 > i1.

Change your comparator to

   return i1 < i2 ? -1 : (i1 > i2) ? 1 : 0;

ADDED

In an attempt to contribute something new to the two other answers that said the same thing and beat me to the punch, most of the wrapper classes have built in compareTo() methods to save you from any thought. e.g., your comparator could just call Integer.compareTo(), i.e.

 return i1.compareTo(i2);
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Probably should be using compareTo() anyway since those magic numbers don't look healthy; +1 for that. –  G. Bach Jan 17 '12 at 20:28
i1 < i2 
i2 > i1 

These are the same.

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because i1 < i2 is the same as i2 > i1 - look what you've written in your compareTo method.

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