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Simple question here: is there any way to convert from a jagged array to a double pointer?

e.g. Convert a double[][] to double**

This can't be done just by casting unfortunately (as it can in plain old C), unfortunately. Using a fixed statement doesn't seem to resolve the problem either. Is there any (preferably as efficient as possible) way to accomplish this in C#? I suspect the solution may not be very obvious at all, though I'm hoping for a straightforward one nonetheless.

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I guess this question boils down to: can you convert from single pointer (to an object) to pointer to a pointer? –  zvolkov May 20 '09 at 20:45
2  
The solution with the "ToPointer" extension method is a bad idea, because then you'd use the pointer outside the 'fixed' area by which time the .NET runtime might have moved the array to another memory location –  Greg Sep 6 '11 at 4:06
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

A double[][] is an array of double[], not of double* , so to get a double** , we first need a double*[]

double[][] array = //whatever
//initialize as necessary

fixed (double* junk = &array[0][0]){

    double*[] arrayofptr = new double*[array.Length];
    for (int i = 0; i < array.Length; i++)
        fixed (double* ptr = &array[i][0])
        {
            arrayofptr[i] = ptr;
        }

    fixed (double** ptrptr = &arrayofptr[0])
    {
        //whatever
    }
}

I can't help but wonder what this is for and if there is a better solution than requiring a double-pointer.

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Unfortunately I can't avoid the user of a double pointer, since I'm calling an external C function, and C# can't automatically marshall jagged arrays. –  Noldorin May 20 '09 at 21:16
    
I'll give this a go as soon as possible by the way. Thanks. –  Noldorin May 20 '09 at 21:16
    
I had to edit this like 6 times to get around SO wanting to parse the *s as italics. The preview window and the actual post were inconsistent in their interpretation... –  bsneeze May 20 '09 at 21:19
    
@zachrrs: So your method seems to do the job well enough. Looping through one of the dimensions isn't the ideal solution in my mind, though I'm thinking it might be necessary in C#. I'm going to leave this question open for a bit longer in case anyone else has something new to add. If not, the answer will be yours. :) –  Noldorin May 20 '09 at 21:43
1  
Are you sure this will work? It seems to me that you pin the inner arrays only when you're assigning them to arrayofptr[i]. That would mean the array can move while you're working with its pointer, which can corrupt memory and cause unpredictable bugs. –  svick Mar 12 '12 at 12:38
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I've gone with zachrrs solution for the time being (which was what I was suspecting might need to be done in the first place). Here it is an extension method:

public static double** ToPointer(this double[][] array)
{
    fixed (double* arrayPtr = array[0])
    {
        double*[] ptrArray = new double*[array.Length];
        for (int i = 0; i < array.Length; i++)
        {
            fixed (double* ptr = array[i])
                ptrArray[i] = ptr;
        }

        fixed (double** ptr = ptrArray)
            return ptr;
    }
}
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2  
You can't use a pointer outside of the fixed block where you declared it, because the object could have moved in the meantime. –  svick Mar 12 '12 at 18:54
    
@svick: Sure you can. It just might not work all the time. As it happens, it does in this case... Maybe one of the Marshal static methods would help make it more robust though. –  Noldorin Mar 13 '12 at 0:04
    
Well, maybe it seems to work right now. But you change one line in an unrelated or just have bad luck one day and it won't work. Your code is wrong. The fact that it currently works is mostly an accident. –  svick Mar 13 '12 at 0:07
    
Yes, that's what I just said. No need to be so fanatical. ;) It also helps to post a solution rather than just down-vote & criticise. –  Noldorin Mar 13 '12 at 0:07
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