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My debugging skills are not helping me much with figuring out what I am doing wrong here.

I want each element in an array to animate after a specified time using setTimeout function.

I am not getting any errors and the loop appears to run just fine, however, none of the elements in the array end up moving from their original place to the new spot.

function publicity()
{
// placing elements with class name 'cCameras' inside an array
var eCamerasArray = $(".cCameras").toArray();
// creating 2 arrays to hold left & top values of each element
var iLeftPosArray = [];
var iTopPosArray = [];
// loop to run through each element in array
for( var i = 0; i < eCamerasArray.length; i++)
{
    // timer variable set for each element to be used in setTimeout func.
    var timer = Math.floor (Math.random()*300) + 100;
    // setTimeout func. used to animate each element after a specified (timer) time
    window.setTimeout (function ()
    {
        iLeftPosArray[i] = Math.floor (Math.random() *139) + 360;
        iTopPosArray[i] = Math.floor (Math.random() *160) + 100 ;
        $(eCamerasArray[i]).animate ({left: iLeftPosArray[i] + "px", top: iTopPosArray[i] + "px"}, 100, "linear");
        return [iLeftPosArray[i], iTopPosArray[i]];
    }, timer);
}
}
share|improve this question
    
javascript doesn't have block level scope, so all functions will refer to the same i.. someone find a duplicate on this :p –  Esailija Jan 17 '12 at 20:25
    
@Esailija, you totally lost me, would you please elaborate. –  Kayote Jan 17 '12 at 20:32
    
@Esailija - He's using it in an array, I don't think he would have that problem with this code. Kayote, start debugging by confirming the value of eCamerasArray, and then the resulting value of iLeftPosArray and iTopPosArray after the loop. –  Kevin B Jan 17 '12 at 20:35
    
@KevinB ? The loop executes immediately, and the i will be same value for all the functions created once the timeouts start firing. There are at least 10 questions per day on this. –  Esailija Jan 17 '12 at 20:39
    
@KevinB, did. Firebug actually runs rather strangely through the function but does run through it all, including outputting the arrays correct content via console.log. iLeftPosArray & iTopPosArray also give the correct values. –  Kayote Jan 17 '12 at 20:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can fix it with creating closure:

(function publicity() {
    var eCamerasArray = $(".cCameras"),
        iLeftPosArray = [],
        iTopPosArray = [],
        timer;
    for(var i = 0; i < eCamerasArray.length; i += 1) {
        timer = Math.floor (Math.random() * 300) + 100;
        (function (i) {
            window.setTimeout (function () {
                iLeftPosArray[i] = Math.floor (Math.random() * 139) + 360;
                iTopPosArray[i] = Math.floor (Math.random() * 160) + 100 ;
                $(eCamerasArray[i]).animate ({left: iLeftPosArray[i] + "px", top: iTopPosArray[i] + "px"}, 300, "linear");
                return [iLeftPosArray[i], iTopPosArray[i]];
            }, timer);
        }(i));
    }
}());

You can see the effect here: http://jsfiddle.net/zHUAt/2/

Best regards!

share|improve this answer
    
thanks. I've read a few posts but never got the hang of closures. Here is what my understanding is from your answer: The function for the setTimeout accepts the 'i' parameter to keep track of what loop no. is currently running. However, Im a bit lost of the last bit, at the end of the function where you have '}(i));, bottom third line. Why is 'i' being multiplied here? –  Kayote Jan 17 '12 at 20:42
1  
You can think of it like the current state of i is saving inside the function body. So in the end you will not call the timeout function with i equals to 3. –  Minko Gechev Jan 17 '12 at 20:44
1  
Actually this (function () { //... }()) is a syntax for self executing function. In the example the function is anonymous and it accepts just a single parameter (that's i but not the same i like in the loop it could be with different value). I'm using '}(i));' because I want to pass i as a parameter to the self executing anonymous function. That's how it's "saving" into it's body the current value of i. I hope that I was clear :-). Best regards! –  Minko Gechev Jan 17 '12 at 20:51
    
thank you so much for taking out the time for this. Ive been thinking and thinking but struggling a bit with this. So in a nutshell, the 'i' inside the function (i) is different to the i above in the loop. However the (i) multiplication is the same 'i' as in the loop... First que, so this anonymous function is independent to the rest of the code in the parent function, except for the multiplication (i) at the end of it. Surely multiplying a function with (i) shouldn't work as you are multiplying a method with a number... –  Kayote Jan 17 '12 at 21:18
1  
@Kayote - No, but you could use (function(y){...})(i) to get that effect –  Kevin B Jan 17 '12 at 21:35

Unrolling a simple loop you can see what happens:

var i = 0;

window.setTimeout( function(){
      //No local i so it must be outside
    console.log(i);

}, 1000 );

i++;

window.setTimeout( function(){
     //No local i so it must be outside
    console.log(i);

}, 1000 );

i++;

window.setTimeout( function(){
      //No local i so it must be outside
    console.log(i);

}, 1000 );

As you can see, all the functions refer to the same i, so they will all log 2 once the timers fire. None of them have a local i.

You can create a "local" i like this:

(function(i){
|---------^  //i found here, no need to use the global i
|   window.setTimeout( function(){
-------------------- //no local i here so it must be outside
        console.log(i);

    }, 1000 );  


})(i) //pass the "global" i as argument, with the value it has right now
share|improve this answer
    
Ummm that's my solution, isn't it? –  Minko Gechev Jan 17 '12 at 20:57
    
@mgechev that's anyone's solution, this question has millions of duplicates in slightly different forms. I was just trying to explain why it doesn't work. –  Esailija Jan 17 '12 at 21:01
    
This is a wonderful explanation. Thank you for clarifying this for me @Esailija. –  Kayote Jan 17 '12 at 21:26

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