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Folks I am making a silly mistake most likely.

I have a model called Comment - a regular model - except I want to store an array within the model (the array is not stored in the db).

Now my code looks something like:

class Comment(model.Model):
  # regular attributes such as id etc.
  #...
  attachments = [] # the attribute I would populate separately

# later...
comments = Comment.objects.filter(...)

comment_attachments_arr = [some array initialized from db separately]

# set the attribute after retrieving from the db

for c in comments:
    comment_attachments_arr = comment_attachments.get(c.id)
    del c.attachments[:] # reset the attachments array
    if comment_attachments_arr:
        c.attachments.extend(comment_attachments_arr)        
    print 'INSIDE for comment id: %s, comment attachments: %s' %( c.id, c.attachments)

for c in comments:
    print 'OUTSIDE for comment id: %s, Comment attachments: %s\n' %( c.id, c.attachments)

My problem is that the print inside the second last for loop shows the correct value for c.attachments - whereas the print inside the for loop that immediately follows shows an empty value for the same record. This is unexpected since both loops are over the same array of comments!

I am most likely missing something obvious and silly - if anyone can spot the issue, please respond.

Thanx!

--Update:

@Anurag

Your suggestion does not seem to work. It seems really non intuitive if looping over queryset results in a another query - perhaps django always wants to get the latest data.

Anyways, I tried the following:

comments_list = list(comments)
for c in comments_list:
    comment_attachments_arr = comment_attachments.get(c.id)
    del c.attachments[:] # clear the attachments array
    print 'BEFORE INSIDE for comment id: %s, comment attachments: %s' %( c.id, c.attachments)
    if comment_attachments_arr:
        c.attachments.extend(comment_attachments_arr)        
    print 'INSIDE for comment id: %s, comment attachments: %s' %( c.id, c.attachments)

print '\n\nFINAL comment attachments ---'
for c in comments_list:
    print 'OUTSIDE for comment id: %s, Comment attachments: %s\n' %( c.id, c.attachments)

Update 2:

I am not exactly sure why, but it works if I substitute the line

del c.attachments[:] 

with

c.attachments = []

I can not respond with this answer till 8 hours..

share|improve this question
    
You don't have an 'array', you have a list. Python does have an array, but that's not what you're using. – jknupp Jan 17 '12 at 20:56
    
@jknupp - which data structure are you reffering to? The "attachments" attribute within the Comment model? If you are talking about comment_attachments_arr - it is not named correctly (sorry) - it is a dict with key as a number (the id) and the value as an array. – serverman Jan 17 '12 at 21:02
    
@jknupp: Python list is an array (or vector) - it is not a linked datastructure, which is what most people think of when they read "list". – Marcin Jan 21 '12 at 15:42

To attach it to the model instance, you need to write self.attachments.

share|improve this answer
    
Not sure what you mean. The attachment is nothing but a simple array with some data that I am trying to associate with each comment instance. – serverman Jan 17 '12 at 21:04
    
attachments is a class attribute in your code, shared between instances of the object. If you want one per instance, you need to write def __init__(self): self.attachments = [] – jknupp Jan 18 '12 at 19:21

There is huge difference between the two statements.

del c.attachments[:]

and

c.attachments = []

del c.attachments[:] actually resets the list. But, by doing c.attachments = [] a blank list is assigned to c.attachments. By this, I mean that other variables bonded would still have the old list. You can see the difference by performing the following examples in python shell.

>>>a=[1,2,3]
>>>b=a               #b is also [1,2,3]
>>>del a[:]          #after this both would be []

and

>>>a=[1,2,3]
>>>b=a               #b is also [1,2,3]
>>>a=[]              #after this a would be [] and b would be [1,2,3]

I hope this helps you out. :)

share|improve this answer
    
Is there anything wrong that I have explained above that I got a down vote? If its really wrong, I would always love to discuss and gain knowledge out of it. :) – Sandip Agarwal Jan 21 '12 at 17:38

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