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In bash, this gives the output in the expected order:

ruby -e "puts 'one'; raise 'two'"
one
-e:1:in `<main>': two (RuntimeError)

But if I redirect STDERR to STDOUT, I get the error before the output, which I do not want:

ruby -e "puts 'one'; raise 'two'" 2>&1 | cat
-e:1:in `<main>': two (RuntimeError)
one

I want to redirect the output to a text file (it behaves the same way as cat above) and get both output and exceptions, but in the same order as when looking at the output in my terminal. Can this be achieved?

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STDEER is always printed into the stream while STDOUT is usually buffered to be printed. –  Maurício Linhares Jan 17 '12 at 20:48
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4 Answers

This happens as follows:

                 true          false 
              ------------- --------------
$stdout.tty?  line-buffered block-buffered
$stderr.tty?  line-buffered line-buffered

You can configure them both the same way with:

$stdout.sync = $stderr.sync = true # or false, of course

My test case:

$stdout.sync = $stderr.sync = true
$stdout.puts 'stdout a'
sleep 2
$stdout.puts 'stdout b'
sleep 2
$stderr.puts 'stderr a'
sleep 2
$stderr.puts 'stderr b'
sleep 2
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It's because STDOUT doesn't always output right away, to force it to output you use IO#flush:

puts "one"
$>.flush

STDERR on the other hand always outputs immediately.

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IO#flush is a better choice if there is a need for flushing the buffer more than once. flush is a single-flush, sync leaves the handle-down and you'll have to jiggle it to get it to stop running. :-) –  the Tin Man Jan 17 '12 at 22:18
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Based on Maurício's and Gir Loves Tacos' answers, I came up with this (via How to turn on STDOUT.sync in ruby from the command line):

ruby -r "/tmp/sync.rb" -e "puts 'one'; raise 'two'" 2>&1 | cat
one
-e:1:in `<main>': two (RuntimeError)

where /tmp/sync.rb contains

STDOUT.sync=true

Or if you can modify the script itself, add that line to the beginning.

Thank you!

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This is what I ended up using it for: github.com/henrik/vim-ruby-runner/commit/… –  Henrik N Jan 17 '12 at 21:16
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ruby -e STDOUT.sync=true -e "puts 'one'; raise 'two'" 2>&1 | cat

should do it

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