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Given a string str:

Normal P start

        feed << feed_item.attributes.merge({
          :photo_url => feed_item.user.cloudfront_url(:thumb),
          :full_name => full_name,
          :meta => '',
          :embed_preview => embed_preview,
          :embed_preview_meta => embed_data
        })

Normal P end

I want to wrap the code in a <code><pre> tag so I have:

re = /((?:^(?:[ ]{4}|\t).*$(?:\r?\n|\z))+)/
str = str.gsub(re, "<pre><code>\n\\1\n</code></pre>")

The problem is that this then yields:

Normal P start

<pre><code>

        feed << feed_item.attributes.merge({
          :photo_url => feed_item.user.cloudfront_url(:thumb),
          :full_name => full_name,
          :meta => '',
          :embed_preview => embed_preview,
          :embed_preview_meta => embed_data
        })
</code></pre>
Normal P end

How can I avoid having blank lines at the top or bottom of the inside <code> tag? I also need to make sure that <code><pre> and </code></pre> are on their own line without anything else?

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3 Answers 3

I'm assuming what you're looking for is:

Normal P start
<pre><code>
        feed << feed_item.attributes.merge({
          :photo_url => feed_item.user.cloudfront_url(:thumb),
          :full_name => full_name,
          :meta => '',
          :embed_preview => embed_preview,
          :embed_preview_meta => embed_data
        })
</code></pre>
Normal P end

Try this:

re = /\n*((?:^(?:[ ]{4}|\t).*$(?:\r?\n|\z))+)\n*/
str.gsub!(re, "\n<pre><code>\n\\1</code></pre>")
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Is that supposed to be str = str.gsub, or is the gsub! intentional? also, this still ends up having the new line right after the pre code tags –  Rachela Meadows Jan 17 '12 at 22:42
    
Hmmm. Your input must be different. I just ran it again with the input above and although I noticed the last line should have \n after </pre>, it does exactly as advertised. If you run it multiple times however it will result in multiple sets of tags. –  tigretigre Jan 17 '12 at 22:45
    
The blank line after Normal P start might be a line of blank spaces causing the error - what if you replace the first \n* with [ \r\n]*? –  mathematical.coffee Jan 17 '12 at 23:35

Haw about this (after your first gsub)

str.gsub!(/\n(\s*\n)+/, "\n")
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This isn't really a problem for a long regular expression. It can be accomplished using that, but fixating on a pattern is clouding the issue:

html = <<EOT

    feed << feed_item.attributes.merge({
      :photo_url => feed_item.user.cloudfront_url(:thumb),
      :full_name => full_name,
      :meta => '',
      :embed_preview => embed_preview,
      :embed_preview_meta => embed_data
    })

EOT

code = html.scan(/^ {4}.+/).join("\n")
formatted_code = "\n<pre><code>\n" + code + "\n</code></pre>\n"
puts html.sub(code, formatted_code)

Which will output:

<pre><code>
    feed << feed_item.attributes.merge({
      :photo_url => feed_item.user.cloudfront_url(:thumb),
      :full_name => full_name,
      :meta => '',
      :embed_preview => embed_preview,
      :embed_preview_meta => embed_data
    })
</code></pre>

The code is looking for lines beginning with four space characters and returning them as an array, joining them with carriage returns, then wrapping them with the <pre><code> blocks.

This will not work with multiple non-contiguous blocks of indented code but with a little re-engineering it would.

Too often we fixate on a particular solution and think it has to look a certain way. Regular expressions are especially seductive that way. They grow in complexity very quickly, making them hard to maintain.

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