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I have a set of text files I merge into a big text file with the maven-antrun-plugin. Yet, I would like to strip empty line and comment lines.

For example:

# Comment 1
ddd=3;

# More comment
eee=4;
fff=5;

would become:

ddd=3;
eee=4;
fff=5;

Is there a maven plugin for this? Or any other solution?

share|improve this question
    
Quick question, why? The java compiler will ignore commented lines and meaningless whitespace. Resultant binaries will look the same with or without these changes. – Mark O'Connor Jan 18 '12 at 19:44
    
It is not source code, it is resource data. – JVerstry Jan 18 '12 at 20:24
    
Completely mis-understood. I've updated my answer below – Mark O'Connor Jan 18 '12 at 20:43

It is nearly impossible to answer penultimate question in here. There are maven plugins all over the place, and new ones appear all the time.

However, I can tell you that none of the standard plugins from the Apache Maven project or the Codehaus Mojo project do this.

You could script sed from ant, or look around harder at the ant filtering capability; it might be able to do this.

share|improve this answer

I misunderstood. You are attempting to clean-up a data file, not source code.

Since you're already using the ANT plugin, why not use the regexp task to strip your files?

<!-- Empty lines -->
<replaceregexp file="${datafile}"
    match="^\s*\n"
    replace=""
    byline="true" />

<!-- Comment lines -->
<replaceregexp file="${datafile}"
    match="^#.*\n"
    replace=""
    byline="true" />

This kind of functionality is often provided by code obfuscation tools.

Never used it, but perhaps you should checkout Proguard. Another possibility is to decompile the compiled byte-code.

See these other answers:

share|improve this answer
    
Scratch that. Proguard appears to obfuscate the binaries, not the source code. – Mark O'Connor Jan 18 '12 at 19:45

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