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I am trying to understand why I am getting a segfault at the indicated line of my code below (noted with:<<<SEGFAULT OCCURS HERE). I wrote this with much inspiration from this post.

I figure it is a memory allocation issue, but considering even when I pass a pointer of an Event instance to the enqueue function, it still segfaults. Considering C is pass by value, even when I pass the address of event (&event not shown in the code I posted here) in main to the enqueue function, it should point to the address of the event instance that exists in main, right? So I am having a hard time understanding why the segmentation fault is occuring.

Please note I am looking more for a reason of why this is occurring rather than just a fix to the problem. I am working on refreshing on C after all. :)

The relevant code:

typedef struct Event_ Event;
struct Event_ {
    char action[4];
    long timestamp;
    char* path;
    char hash[9];
    Event *nextEvent; // pointer to next Event instance in Queue
};    

    // Enqueues newEvent into queue. Returns 1 on success, 0 otherwise.
int enqueue(Event newEvent, Event **head, Event **tail) {
    if (head != NULL) {
        // make the old head point to the newly inserted Event, 
        // and the new Event to point to NULL (nothing comes before head):
        (*head) -> nextEvent = &newEvent;
        newEvent.nextEvent = NULL;
    } else {
        // first element being added to queue.
        *tail = &newEvent; //<<<SEGFAULT OCCURS HERE
    }
    // designate the new Event as the new head:
    *head = &newEvent;

    return 1;
}

// Parse line and return an Event struct.
Event parseLineIntoEvent(char* line) {
    Event event = {0};
    char* lineSegment;

    int i = 0;
    lineSegment = strtok(line, " ");
    while (lineSegment != NULL) {
        if (i > 3) {
            printf("WARNING: input format error!\n");
            break;
        }
        if (i == 0)
            strncpy(event.action, lineSegment, sizeof(event.action)-1);
        else if(i == 1)
            event.timestamp = atoi(lineSegment);
        else if(i == 2) {
            event.path = malloc(sizeof(char) * (strlen(lineSegment) + 1));
            strcpy(event.path, lineSegment);
        } else if(i == 3)
            strncpy(event.hash, lineSegment, sizeof(event.hash)-1);
        lineSegment = strtok(NULL, " ");
        i++;
    } // while
    return event;
} // parseLineIntoEvent()

int main (int argc, const char * argv[]) {
    //...
    Event **head = NULL;
    Event **tail = NULL;
    for (; numLines > 0; numLines--) {
        char *line = getLineFromStdin(); //malloced char array being returned
        printf("%s\n",line);
        Event event = parseLineIntoEvent(line);
        if(!enqueue(event, head, tail))
            printf("An error occurred when attempting to enqueue an Event.\n");
        event = dequeue(head, tail);
        //...
        free(event.path);
        free(line);
    }

    return 0;
}

Thanks in advance!

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The enqueue function is broken. You pass the newEvent by value, this will not modify the event you pass in. –  pmr Jan 17 '12 at 23:39

3 Answers 3

Event **tail = NULL;

tail is NULL, and you're dereferencing it on the line you marked. It needs to be made to point to a Event* before you can dereference it:

Either

Event *ev;
Event **tail = &ev;

Or

Event** tail = malloc(sizeof(Event*));

... 

free(tail);

Though, I think you mean to have just a pointer to an Event, and pass its address by value:

Event *tail = NULL, *head = NULL;

...

enqueue(event, &head, &tail);

So that head and tail are modified inside enqueue.

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1  
The question is tagged C; so new is inappropriate. –  Dave Jan 17 '12 at 23:44
    
@Dave sorry, I forget which tag I'm in all the time. For such stupid errors, please feel free to edit my answers in the future. –  Seth Carnegie Jan 18 '12 at 0:25

You are dereferencing a null pointer.

int main (int argc, const char * argv[]) {
    //...
    Event **head = NULL;
    Event **tail = NULL;
    for (; numLines > 0; numLines--) {
        //...
        if(!enqueue(event, head, tail)) // head and tail are NULL here
        //...
    }
}

int enqueue(Event newEvent, Event **head, Event **tail) {
    if (head != NULL) {  // head is NULL, else path will be executed
        //...
    } else {
        // first element being added to queue.
        *tail = &newEvent; //<<<SEGFAULT OCCURS HERE because tail is null.
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your code contains at least two bugs:

  1. As pointed out by others you are passing in a NULL pointer for tail and dereferencing will cause the segfault
  2. You pass in newEvent by value. This means a copy of the struct will be made and put on stack. Inside the function you do *head = &newEvent which takes the address of the object which is on the stack and put it in the queue. After you return from the enqueue function the stack will be cleaned up and you point to garbage. You need to change your eneueue to int enqueue(Event *newEvent, Event **head, Event **tail) and pass a pointer to the event.

I'm not sure why you use pointer to pointer and also your queue seems semantically broken (head is typically the start and enqueue typically appends things at the end)

int enqueue(Event *event, Event **head, Event **tail)
{
    if (*head != NULL)
    {
        // we do have a head: point next to current head
        event->nextEvent = *head;
    }
    else
    {
        // no head so we also should have no tail
        *tail = event;
        event->nextEvent = NULL;
    }

    // newly enqueued event is now head
    *head = event;

    return 1;
}

Use it:

Event *head = NULL;
Event *tail = NULL;

...

Event newEvent = parseLineIntoEvent(char* line);
enqueue(&newEvent, &head, &tail);

Although you should consider putting newEvent on the heap by returning Event * from parseLineIntoEvent (use malloc to allocate the memory for it)

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